Stuart Gitlow

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Stuart Gitlow (born November 29, 1962) is a general, forensic, and addiction psychiatrist, Executive Director of the Annenberg Physician Training Program in Addictive Diseases at Mount Sinai School of Medicine,[1][2] and President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He is against the legalization of cannabis arguing that "people can ... experience long-term psychiatric disease".[3]

Biography[edit]

Gitlow was born on November 29, 1962. He earned a Master of Public Health degree from the University of Pittsburgh and Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Rhode Island. He received an M.D. from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Following graduation his psychiatric and public health training was at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Harvard University for his forensic fellowship.[4]

Gitlow has held a number of prominent professional positions in the medicine and public health communities. He is medical expert to the Social Security Department's Office of Disability Adjudication and Review,[citation needed] President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine,[citation needed] American Society of Addiction Medicine delegate to the American Medical Association,[5] and chair of the American Medical Association Council on Science and Public Health.[citation needed]

Academia[edit]

Gitlow is a faculty member at Dartmouth Medical School and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He gives regular invited lectures on the subject of addictive disease.[citation needed] He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Addictive Diseases.[citation needed]

Politics[edit]

Gitlow has twice unsuccessfully sought the Democratic Party nomination for Rhode Island General Assembly representative for Woonsocket, Rhode Island district 49.[6]

Works[edit]

Gitlow is a regular columnist for Counselor, frequent contributor to textbooks about addiction medicine, and in 2001 published the book Practical Guides in Psychiatry: Substance Use Disorders (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins).[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Courant.com". 2007-10-10. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  2. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=eVsxAAAAIBAJ&sjid=XqMFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1267,581518&dq=stuart+gitlow&hl=en
  3. ^ Stuart Gitlow (July 30, 2014). "Marijuana legalization is a risk not worth taking". CNN. Retrieved 2014-07-30. But with marijuana, people can also experience long-term psychiatric disease, and those who use it heavily prior to age 25 are more likely than nonusers to experience a drop in IQ. ... 
  4. ^ "Stuart Gitlow, MD, MPH, MBA, FAPA". American Society of Addiction Medicine . Retrieved 2014-07-30. Stuart Gitlow, MD, MPH, MBA is the Executive Director of the Annenberg Physician Training Program in Addictive Disease, which he started in 2005 to ensure medical student access to training that stimulates them to develop and maintain interest in working with patients with addiction. He serves as Chair of the AMA’s Council on Science and Public Health. Dr. Gitlow is the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and serves as ASAM’s delegate to the AMA. Board certified in general, addiction, and forensic psychiatry, Dr. Gitlow has an active addiction medicine practice. Graduate of MIT and Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Gitlow’s psychiatric and public health training took place in Pittsburgh, following which he went to Harvard for his forensic fellowship. ... 
  5. ^ "Excessive Video Gaming May Not Be An Addiction". Emaxhealth.com. 2007-06-26. Retrieved 2011-02-01. 
  6. ^ Woonsocket Patch article, Sept. 5, 2012