Stubby Clapp

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Stubby Clapp
Second baseman
Born: (1973-02-24) February 24, 1973 (age 41)
Windsor, Ontario
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 18, 2001 for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 2001 for the St. Louis Cardinals
Career statistics
Batting average .200
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 1
Teams

Richard Keith "Stubby" Clapp (born February 24, 1973) is a minor league baseball hitting coach and former professional baseball player. He played for 11 years, most notably within the St. Louis Cardinals organization, including a brief stint in Major League Baseball with the Cardinals. In his native Canada, he is best remembered for his performance at the 1999 Pan American Games in Winnipeg, where he slapped a bases-loaded single in the 11th inning to beat a more experienced U.S. team and put Canada in the semifinals. Canada eventually won bronze medal.

Early life[edit]

In his youth, Stubby Clapp could be considered a two-sport athlete. Having distinguished himself through the Windsor minor hockey system. After playing Bantam hockey in Windsor, Clapp played an important role for the Windsor Bulldogs (currently, LaSalle Vipers) from 1990 to 1992. In 1991, the Bulldogs clinched 1st place during the regular season and Clapp scored 5 goals during the playoffs. For the 1991–1992 team, he was named captain of the team.[1]

Baseball career[edit]

Clapp graduated from Texas Tech University, where he played for the Red Raiders baseball team. He still holds (or shares) the Red Raiders' records for triples in a season (8), runs in game (5, 3 times), strikeouts in a game (4) and walks in a season (66), both set during the 1996 season.[2] He was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 36th round (1,058th overall) of 1996 amateur entry draft. In 1998, when playing for the Double-A Arkansas Travelers he led the league with 86 walks and 139 games played. He remains popular among Travelers fans to this day.

In 1999, Clapp was part of the Canadian team at the Pan Pan American Games in Winnipeg. A popular player with his teammates, Clapp became a minor media celebrity within Canada after his game-winning, bases-loaded single against the U.S. team.

In 2000, he led the Triple-A Memphis Redbirds with 138 hits, 89 runs, 80 walks, 8 triples, and 6 sacrifice hits.[3]

He was part of Team Canada in the 2004 Summer Olympics who finished in fourth place. He also played for Canada in the 2006 World Baseball Classic. In 3 games, Clapp hit .154, with a triple and an RBI.

Clapp played 23 games in 2001 for the St. Louis Cardinals. Clapp had 5 hits in 25 at bats, including 2 doubles and 1 RBI.[4]

Clapp became a popular figure in the City of Memphis during his four-year stint (1999-2002) with the Triple-A Memphis Redbirds. He was often referred to as the "Mayor of Memphis."[5] During the 2002 season, the 5-foot-8 Clapp was featured on a growth chart for kids, sponsored by a Memphis-area medical group. In 2009, he was named one of the Memphis "Athletes of the Decade."[6] In 2010, the club had "Ode to Clapping Night," which included giving away Clapp bobbleheads.[7]

However, Clapp was also popular in Syracuse and other cities where he played.[8]

In 911 minor league games, Clapp had a .270 batting average, 48 home runs, 50 triples, 196 doubles, 365 RBI, and 83 steals. Clapp also pitched in 3 games. In 2.1 innings, Clapp has given up 2 hits and no earned runs.

He also played for the Edmonton Cracker Cats. In 2006, Clapp played for Canada in the inaugural World Baseball Classic. He was one of two second basemen on the roster and drove in a run.

Post-playing career[edit]

On April 21, 2007, Clapp's jersey #10 was the first number ever retired by the Memphis Redbirds,.[9] This is commemorated by a painted "10" on the wall above the Redbirds' bullpen at AutoZone Park. He is second all-time for the Memphis Redbirds for games played (425) and hits (418).[6]

Clapp began his coaching career as a hitting coach for the Lexington Legends, the Houston Astros "A" ball team in the South Atlantic League. He came out of retirement to represent Canada at the 2008 Beijing Olympics,[10] and was named to the roster for the 2009 World Baseball Classic.[11]

In November 2010, Clapp became the hitting coach for the Corpus Christi Hooks, Houston's AA affiliate.

Clapp managed the Tri-City ValleyCats, a Single-A affiliate of the Houston Astros, during the 2011 and 2012 seasons.[12]

In January 2013, Clapp was hired as the hitting coach for the Dunedin Blue Jays, Toronto's A affiliate. [13]

Personal life[edit]

Clapp is “Stubby the Third,” a nickname passed on from his father and grandfather.[14] He is married with a pair of sons, Cooper (officially Stubby IV) and Cannan, and a daughter, Crosby. [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Windsor Bulldogs Official Program 1991–92 (October 1991) Bulldogs Profile - #17 Stubby Clapp, p.31.
  2. ^ Texas Tex baseball records texastech.com (accessed June 13, 2010)
  3. ^ Cardinals' Media Relations, ed. (2001). St. Louis Cardinals 2001 Media Guide. Hadler Printing Company. pp. A–56–A57, D–23. 
  4. ^ "ESPN Stubby Clapp Stats". 
  5. ^ Edes, Gordon Stubby stumps for Canada Yahoo sports, March 6, 2009 (accessed June 13, 2010)
  6. ^ a b c Murtaugh, Frank Memphis Athletes of the Decade: #5 — Stubby Clapp Memphis Flyer, August 17, 2009 (accessed June 13, 2010)
  7. ^ Morgan, Marlon W. 'Rhino,' dogs, Stubby get day at AutoZone Park Commercial Appeal, June 10, 2010 (accessed June 13, 2010)
  8. ^ Druzin, Randi Stubby Clapp Time magazine, July 30, 2004 (accessed June 13, 2010)
  9. ^ Parkinson, Kyle Redbirds retire Royals, 4-2 minorleaguebaseball.com (accessed June 13, 2010)
  10. ^ "CBC Olympics – Clapp to play for Canada at Beijing Olympics". [dead link]
  11. ^ TSN.ca | Canadians move on from loss of pitchers, look ahead to WBC
  12. ^ [1] espn.com transactions (accessed November 22, 2010)
  13. ^ [2] espn.com transactions (accessed January 15, 2013)
  14. ^ http://mopupduty.com/index.php/stubby-clapp-era-is-over/

External links[edit]