Student Senate for California Community Colleges

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
              Student Senate for               California Community Colleges
Student Senate for CCC logo.jpg
Logo of the SSCCC
Formation 2006
Headquarters 1102 Q Street, 3rd Floor
Sacramento, California,
United States  95811
2014–2015
President
Omar Paz Jr.
Website studentsenateccc.org
Entrance to the California Community Colleges offices at 1102 Q Street in Sacramento, California.

The Student Senate for California Community Colleges (abbreviated SSCCC) is a group of people who regularly participate in shared governance processes in the California Community Colleges System. They also participate in law-making processes at the California State Capitol. The SSCCC has opposed decreases in public funding for education and it has opposed increases in student fees.[1]

Profile[edit]

The people who use the assumed name "Student Senate for California Community Colleges" describe themselves as a "student body organization".[2] The SSCCC's constitution provides that "All meetings of the SSCCC shall abide by the provisions stated in the Ralph M. Brown Act".[3] The SSCCC is funded, in part, by moneys collected pursuant to a law that permits the establishment of a student representation fee.[4][5] The SSCCC has requested that moneys be donated "to the Student Senate for California Community Colleges so that we can continue to effectively represent all students".[6]

The SSCCC's constitution provides that the SSCCC will "serve as the voice of the students in matters of statewide concern and before the Board of Governors,[7] Consultation Council[8] and all statewide boards, committees, and ad hoc groups".[9] An executive order issued by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges provides that the membership of the Consultation Council shall include “2 students, who shall be selected by the Student Senate”.[10]

The Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges has recognized the SSCCC as "the representative of community college-associated student organizations before the Board of Governors and the Chancellor's Office".[11] That recognition empowers the SSCCC to nominate students to be appointed to the Board of Governors.[12]

The name "California Community Colleges" is the property of the State of California.[13] That name cannot be used by an organization without the permission of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. By recognizing the SSCCC as "the representative of community college-associated student organizations before the Board of Governors and the Chancellor's Office", the Board has tacitly approved the SSCCC's use of the name "California Community Colleges".

Organizational Structure[edit]

The SSCCC's constitution provides for Delegates, Regional Governance & Policy and External Affairs Senators, a President, a Vice President of Governance & Policy and a Vice President of External Affairs, a Secretary, a Treasurer, a Communications Officer, and an Advisor.

Delegates[edit]

Delegates meet twice in each academic year; once during the Fall semester and once during the Spring semester. A meeting of the Delegates is called a General Assembly. Each Delegate is entitled to cast one vote on each matter submitted to a vote of the Delegates. A General Assembly may amend the SSCCC's constitution, it may adopt resolutions, and it may adopt policies that guide and regulate the functioning of committees and other subsidiary bodies.

Regional Senators[edit]

The Delegates have organized ten regional subdivisions of the SSCCC.[14] Region I (one) is located in the very north of the state and Region X (ten) is in the very south of the state.[15] Each region has a constitution that provides for the election of Regional Senators and other regional officers. Regional meetings are usually held on a monthly basis. The SSCCC's constitution authorizes each region to conduct business on behalf of the SSCCC.[16]

Each region annually elects 3 Regional Senators. The SSCCC's constitution provides that each Regional Senator shall meet the statutory eligibility requirements that apply to the officers of community college student body associations. Those requirements are set forth in California Education Code Section 76061.[17]

At Large Senators[edit]

Previously when the SSCCC formed, there was the position of At Large Senator, which were elected during the spring General Assemblies held by the SSCCC. 10 Senators would be elected and would work on various projects and areas not pertaining to just one region. The position of At Large Senator was terminated after the passage of a resolution that was presented at the Fall 2010 General Assembly held in San Diego and initially ended at the conclusion of the 2011 Term and was converted to become the External Affairs Senatorial Position for each region.

Student Senate Council[edit]

The 30 Regional Senators (3 from each of the 10 regions) are required to hold at least 10 "Student Senate Council" meetings during each academic year. The Student Senate Council implements policies that have been adopted by the General Assembly, and it may adopt bylaws that govern the conduct of elections, the collection and expenditure of money, and "other necessary business of the Student Senate Council".[18]

Executive Officers[edit]

The President, Vice-President of Governance and Policy, Vice-President of External Affairs Secretary, Treasurer, and Communications Officer are the "Executive Officers" of the SSCCC. They are elected annually by and from among the Regional Senators during a meeting of the Student Senate Council. The Executive Officers are the members of a standing committee named the "Executive Committee".

Advisor[edit]

The Advisor is selected in accordance with Article VI of the SSCCC's constitution. The Advisor provides "guidance, support and continuity to the SSCCC at the state level".[19]

Constituency[edit]

The SSCCC's constitution provides that all community college students are the SSCCC's constituency. These students are not eligible to vote in SSCCC elections but many of them are eligible to vote in the election of community college student body association officers, and some of these officers may in turn become Delegates and Regional Senators and Executive Officers of the SSCCC.

Prior to and during a General Assembly, community college students can submit resolutions for consideration by the Delegates. On the final day of a General Assembly, proposed resolutions are debated and then adopted or rejected. Any student in attendance can participate in debate but only the Delegates may cast votes.

The right to participate[edit]

Chapter 1238 of the Statutes of 1987 enacted amendments to California Education Code Section 76060. Those amendments imposed on community college student body associations the duty to "encourage students to participate in the governance of the college". In the following year, the involvement of students in college governance was expanded by Chapter 973 of the Statutes of 1988.[20] That chapter enacted California Education Code Section 70901. That section required the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges to adopt "Minimum standards governing procedures established by governing boards of community college districts to ensure faculty, staff, and students the right to participate effectively in district and college governance, and the opportunity to express their opinions at the campus level and to ensure that these opinions are given every reasonable consideration…"[21] In accordance with that requirement, the Board of Governors adopted Section 51023.7 of Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations. That regulation provides, in part, that the governing board of a community college district "shall recognize each associated student organization or its equivalent within the district as provided by Education Code Section 76060, as the representative body of the students to offer opinions and to make recommendations to the administration of a college and to the governing board of a district with regard to district and college policies and procedures that have or will have a significant effect on students".[22]

By these enactments and others, community college students have the right and opportunity to participate in the governance of community colleges and community college districts. Their participation in college and district governance processes prepares them to become Delegates, Regional Senators, and Executive Officers of the SSCCC, and then members of the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Consultation Council.[23]

Chancellor's SSCCC Liaison[edit]

In October 2010 the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges appointed a "SSCCC Liaison" to provide support and guidance to the Student Senate Council.[24] The position of SSCCC Liaison is currently held by Julie Moore.[25]

History[edit]

The SSCCC was established in May 2006. It was preceded by several similar organizations: the California Junior College Association;[26] the California Community College Student Government Association;[27] the Community College Student Lobby;[28] and the California Student Association of Community Colleges (CalSACC).[29] After the dissolution of CalSACC, its remaining assets[30] were donated to the SSCCC. The sum of $57,150.53 was transferred to the SSCCC on June 3, 2008.[31]

The California Student Association of Community Colleges had ten organizational subdivisions, which were called “regions”. After the collapse of CalSACC, those regions continued functioning autonomously. On May 6 and 7, 2006, community college student leaders from throughout California gathered at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in San Diego, California. They considered several model constitutions for a new statewide student organization. They chose a constitutional model that grouped the former CalSACC regions together under the name “Student Senate for California Community Colleges”. Then, each of the ten regions selected two representatives, and those 20 representatives ratified the SSCCC constitution on May 7, 2006. The regions subsequently changed their names to reflect the fact that they had become regions of the SSCCC.

Western steps and entrance of the California State Capitol.

On March 5, 2012 the SSCCC, the California State Student Association, and the University of California Student Association sponsored a rally at the California State Capitol. About 8,000 people gathered on the western steps of the capitol and listened to speeches by student leaders and by state leaders, including Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, Assembly Speaker John Pérez, and Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg.[32] After the rally, protestors from the Occupy movement entered the capitol and refused to leave. Officers of the California Highway Patrol arrested 72 people for trespassing.[33] These events generated dozens of news reports.[34]

On January 7, 2013 SSCCC President Rich Copenhagen and Treasurer Charles Stevens testified before the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.[35] These SSCCC officers represented their constituents in accordance with Section 50002(b) of Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations.[36] Their testimony was video recorded by 3C Media Solutions.[37]

Past Presidents                                         Past Presidents                                         Current President                    
2006 – Melvin Haywood[38] 2010 – 2011: Alex Pader[39] 2014 – 2015: Omar Paz Jr.[40]
2007 – Alan Crane[41] 2011 – 2012: Kevin Feliciano[42]
2007 – 2008: Frank Fernandez[43] 2012 – 2013: Rich Copenhagen[44]
2008 – 2009: Richael Young[45] 2013 – 2014: Aaron Bielenberg[46]
2009 – 2010: Reid Milburn[47]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ March in March 2011: Prioritizing Higher Education.
  2. ^ Student Senate for California Community Colleges CONSTITUTION, Article I.
  3. ^ Student Senate for California Community Colleges CONSTITUTION, Article IX, Section 3.
  4. ^ Student representation fee; California Education Code Section 76060.5.
  5. ^ Assembly Bill 2576 proposed the "student representation fee". That bill was drafted by Gregory G. Hayes, Vice President of the Student Association of American River College. It was introduced by Assembly Member Tom Hayden and signed into law by Governor George Deukmejian. The bill was chaptered by Secretary of State March Fong Eu as Chapter 1238 of the Statutes of 1987.
  6. ^ SSCCC Donation Letter.
  7. ^ Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.
  8. ^ California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office; Consultation Council.
  9. ^ SSCCC Constitution; Article II, Section 1(a).
  10. ^ Consultation Council membership.
  11. ^ Board of Governors' recognition of SSCCC; California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 50002.
  12. ^ Student members of the Board of Governors; California Education Code Section 71000(C).
  13. ^ The name "California Community Colleges" is State property; California Education Code Section 71025.
  14. ^ SSCCC Regions.
  15. ^ Map of the SSCCC Regions.
  16. ^ SSCCC Constitution; Article V, Section 1.
  17. ^ Eligibility requirements; California Education Code Section 76061.
  18. ^ SSCCC Constitution; Article IV, Section 7.
  19. ^ SSCCC Constitution; Article VI, Section 1, page 5.
  20. ^ Chapter 973 of the Statutes of 1988. This chapter is often referred to as Assembly Bill 1725.  That bill was introduced by Assembly Member John Vasconcellos.
  21. ^ The right to participate effectively in district and college governance; California Education Code Section 70901.
  22. ^ Recognition of student body associations; California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 51023.7.
  23. ^ Student Senate Representatives; Consultation Council Membership.
  24. ^ Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, meeting of January 10-11, 2011, agenda item 8.1, page 4.
  25. ^ Julie Moore, in "Student Services and Special Programs Staff Directory".
  26. ^ Winter, Carl G. “History of the Junior College Movement in California”. California State Department of Education, December 21, 1964.
  27. ^ California Community College Student Government Association; in Opinions of the California Attorney General, Volume 65, page 638 (1982), cited in Funeral Security Plans, Inc., Plaintiff and Appellant, v. State Board of Funeral Directors et al., Defendant and Appellant.
  28. ^ Community College Student Lobby; California Secretary of State Business Entity Number C1096599.
  29. ^ California Student Association of Community Colleges; in Chapter 35 of the Statutes of 2007.
  30. ^ Remaining assets; California Corporations Code Section 18130.
  31. ^ Donations and Grants made to the SSCCC.
  32. ^ hÉochaidh, Roibín Ó. "Students rally in Sacramento against public-education cuts". UC Berkeley News Center, The Regents of the University of California, March 6, 2012.
  33. ^ Asimov, Nanette. "Sacramento higher-ed protest leads to 72 arrests". SFGate, March 6, 2012.
  34. ^ "March in March" articles and photographs archive. City College of San Francisco.
  35. ^ Board of Governors meeting minutes of January 7–8, 2013, page 6.
  36. ^ California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 50002(b).
  37. ^ "Board of Governors Meeting | January 2013". 3C Media Solutions.
  38. ^ Student Senate Council meeting notice for October 7 & 8, 2006. Melvin Haywood listed as "Student Senate Council President".
  39. ^ Freedberg, Louis. "Muted response to proposed community college fee hikes". California Watch, January 28, 2011.
  40. ^ Hart, Dianne Reber. "Reluctant student politician now the voice for millions". PressDemocrat.com, August 15, 2014.
  41. ^ Paramo, Joel R. "Crane heads state student senate". The Renegade Rip, February 7, 2007.
  42. ^ Pérez, John A. "California Student Associations Announce Support for Speaker’s Middle Class Scholarship Act". California State Assembly Democratic Caucus, April 5, 2012.
  43. ^ "Student named statewide president". Imperial Valley Press, July 13, 2007.
  44. ^ Boyle, Brian. "Law allows student fee to increase: AB 1358 mandates funding for college lobbyist organization". Accent Advocate, October 26, 2013.
  45. ^ Eshoo, Anna G. "Tribute To Richael Young On Being Elected President Of The Student Senate For California Community Colleges". Capitol Words, published by the Sunlight Foundation, July 23, 2008.
  46. ^ Wilson, Daniel. "Marchers demand lower tuition fees". SacCityExpress.com, March 12, 2014.
  47. ^ McKinley, Jesse. "California Students Protest Education Cuts". The New York Times, March 4, 2010.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

SSCCC Regions[edit]