Student Space Exploration & Technology Initiative

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The Student Space Exploration & Technology Initiative (SSETI) is a unique project put into execution by students from different universities spread over European countries. In collaboration with space industry they aim to build microsatellites together.

The main objective of this initiative is to create a network of students, educational institutions and organisations (on the Internet) facilitating the distributed design, construction and launch of (micro)-satellites and other spacecraft.[not verified in body]

Most universities do not have capabilities to build their own complete satellite. The SSETI aims to combine different academic capabilities to realise pan-European student missions. Space projects, which are beyond the local existing capabilities, will be made possible through the fragmentation and redistribution of a large number of small, locally achievable tasks. Ambitious projects, such as a Moonlander, may be realised by this distributed development.[not verified in body]

SWARM[edit]

SWARM is the youngest project in line. SWARM will be developed consisting by a nanosatellite releasing femtosatellites into low Earth orbit from where scientific and/or technical experiments will be conducted.[citation needed]

ESEO[edit]

The ESEO (European Student Earth Orbiter) project was started as part of the SSETI project family, in collaboration with the European Space Agency who now run the project independently from SSETI. The project is currently on the way[when?] of moving from Phase B (Detailed design) to Phase C (Development), meaning that the teams working on the satellite are now starting to build and test parts of the systems.[citation needed]

ESMO[edit]

The ESMO (European Student Moon Orbiter) project was started as part of the SSETI project family, in collaboration with the European Space Agency who now run the project independently from SSETI. The project is currently[when?] going through its Phase B.[citation needed]

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