Sturla Jónsson (political party)

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Sturla Jónsson, formerly known as the Forward Moving Party (Icelandic: Framfaraflokkurinn), is a newly formed Icelandic political party. The party was known as the Forward Moving Party from its founding on 17 December 2008 to 5 April 2013 when it was renamed after its founder.[1]

The chairman of the party is Sturla Jónsson, teamster and protester, who is today most commonly known for his participation in a documentary movie about the Icelandic financial crisis in 2009.[2] The political ideology of the party is currently unknown. It was officially founded on 17 December 2008, and in early 2009 it managed to collect more than 300 signatures for the purpose of running in the April 2009 parliamentary election. The party was granted the election letter A,[3] but then subsequently failed to recruit enough candidates to actually represent the party and participate in the election. So it was never approved to participate, despite of having applied with sufficient signatures.[4]

In January 2013, it was rumoured by several Icelandic websites that the party was planning to contest the April 2013 parliamentary election. On 23 February, the party announced it had indeed now collected the minimum of 300 signatures, and applied to participate in the election with list letter K.[5] The party received list letter K from the Ministry of Interior on 8 March 2013,[6] and then established its election campaign centre in Sturla's old workshop with the main purpose to start composing a valid candidate list.[7] When the deadline for submitting candidate lists expired on 12 April, the party was approved to participate in one of the six constituencies: Reykjavik Constituency South.[8][9]

It shall be noted, that Sturla Jónsson's attempt also to list in other constituencies as a single independent candidate (without a list), was disapproved both by the electoral committees in these constituencies and by the National electoral Commission.[10][11] This disapproval was expected, as the Icelandic constitution and election law stipulates that independent candidates are not allowed to run in parliamentary elections, unless they manage to join forces with other independent candidates to establish a full complete candidate list for a new group named "independent candidates" in the constituency they intend to run.[12] Another peculiarity for the party's top candidate, is that he resides in the Reykjavik Constituency North, but opted to list his party list in the Reykjavík South constituency, and thus will not be able to vote for himself. Sturla explained he believed the biggest support base for his party was to be found in his neighbour constituency, which was the reason he had preferred to list there, but also used the opportunity to highlight that his party would actively work to reform the election law, so that Iceland in future elections should not be divided into any vote limiting constituencies, but instead only have one list of available parties and candidates for the entire island.[13] Beside of this single political point, the party however has not yet published a political program on their official website.

Electoral results[edit]

Parliament[edit]

Election # of
overall votes
% of
overall vote
# of
overall seats won
+/– Position
2013 Steady 222 Steady 0.12
0 / 63
Steady 0 Steady 13th

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The party is called Sturla Jonsson" (in Icelandic). Mbl.is. 5 April 2013. Retrieved 6 April 2013. 
  2. ^ "God bless Iceland!". Iris Film + Felix Film + Ma.Ja.De. Film (in Swedish speak with Danish text). DR.dk. January 2010. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "Two new list letters for the election" (in Icelandic). 23 February 2009. 
  4. ^ "Announcement from the National Electoral Commission on the Arts, which will be in supply to the general election 25 April 2009" (in Icelandic). 17 April 2009. 
  5. ^ "General elections 2013 - News" (in Icelandic). Retrieved 28 May 2012. 
  6. ^ "Five new list letters" (in Icelandic). Innanríkisráðuneytið (Ministry of Interior). 8 March 2013. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  7. ^ "Election campaign centre in old workshop" (in Icelandic). Ruv.is. 19 March 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2013. 
  8. ^ "Announcement by the National Electoral Commission about available political parties in the parliamentary elections 27 April 2013" (PDF) (in Icelandic). Landskjörstjórn (The National Electoral Commission). 16 April 2013. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  9. ^ "Announcements: Notice of lists that will participate in the parliamentary election on 27 April 2013" (in Icelandic). Landskjörstjórn (The National Electoral Commission). 16 April 2013. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  10. ^ "All lists of candidates submitted" (in Icelandic). Ruv.is. 12 April 2013. Retrieved 12 April 2013. 
  11. ^ "General election: Eleven parties will participate with a list in the South constituency" (in Icelandic). Eyjafrettir.is. 15 April 2013. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  12. ^ "Plans for 72 candidate lists in elections" (in Icelandic). Ruv.is. 14 April 2013. Retrieved 15 April 2013. 
  13. ^ "Sturla Jonsson can not vote for himself" (in Icelandic). Ruv.is. 15 April 2013. Retrieved 19 April 2013.