Sue and Sunny

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Sue and Sunny were a vocal duo and session singers operating in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. Although sisters, their full stage names were Sue Glover and Sunny Leslie. For three years they were members of British pop group The Brotherhood of Man.

Career[edit]

Born Yvonne Wheatman ('Sue') and Heather Wheatman ('Sunny') in Madras, India they made their recording debut together in 1963 under the name The Myrtelles with their cover version of Lesley Gore's "Just Let Me Cry" on the small and lesser-known Oriole record label. The single was not successful and the girls decided on a change of name, to The Stockingtops. In 1965 they sang backing vocals on Alex Harvey's single "Agent OO Soul" / "Go Away Baby" (Fontana - TF 610), produced by Chris Blackwell of Island Records.

In 1966, when Sunny (the younger of the pair) was still only 15, the two turned professional doing the cabaret circuit. After three years they decided that their audiences were too old for them, and went to Germany to play the airbase circuit, where, despite releasing two German singles, they still felt out of place and returned to London.

Whilst in London they were asked to do a session as backing singers for Lesley Duncan. The session went well and suddenly the duo found themselves in demand, recording with, amongst many others, Dusty Springfield, Elton John, Love Affair, Lulu, Mott the Hoople, T. Rex, Tom Jones, David Bowie and Joe Cocker. It was the Cocker sessions, and in particular "With a Little Help from My Friends" that propelled the girls into the limelight. When "With A Little Help" reached number one in the UK Singles Chart they found themselves accompanying Cocker on several television programmes including Top of the Pops. They now found themselves working with artists as diverse as James Last, Frank Zappa, Giorgio Moroder, and Brotherhood of Man, with whom they charted in 1970 with the hit single, "United We Stand". In March 1972, they just missed the UK top 30 with the single "Third Finger, Left Hand", released under the name The Pearls, a group name that was more successful with the personnel of Lyn Cornell and Ann Simmons.

Sue and Sunny themselves are a little unsure of how many records they have actually released. In an interview with Disc[1] on sale on 20 April 1974, Sunny was quoted as saying "Sue and I found ourselves recording on our own and we had a couple of singles put out. But nothing really happened for us". In fact they appear to have recorded around a dozen singles, but to confuse things further they also recorded under the names Sue & Sunshine, The Stockingtops, and as part of The Nirvana Orchestra. They also recorded an album for CBS which was, confusingly, also released - with a different cover - on the CBS subsidiary, Reflection.

Sunny finally had a hit record with "Doctor's Orders" in 1974,[2] and in 1976 Sue, now known as 'Sue Glover' recorded a solo album for DJM, entitled Solo. On three occasions, Sue and Sunny have sung backing vocals at the Eurovision Song Contest. In 1969, they accompanied Lulu to victory in Madrid, performing "Boom Bang-a-Bang". They returned to support Joy Fleming in Stockholm, in 1975, joining Madeline Bell to back up the German entry "Ein Lied kann eine Brücke sein", which placed seventeenth. In 1981 Sue resurfaced with an entry in the UK Song for Europe competition fronting the group 'Unity' with the song "For Only A Day", but failed to find favour with the voting juries, finishing in last place.

Sue and Sunny joined forces again to sing backing vocals for Vikki Watson's UK entry "Love Is..." in Gothenburg at the 1985 Eurovision final. This song was placed fourth.

In 1979, Sue Glover appeared in the debut TV play from Victoria Wood, Talent, playing the part of club singer 'Cathy Christmas'.

See also[edit]

Brotherhood of Man

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sunny". Alwynwturner.com. 1974-04-20. Retrieved 2012-12-31. 
  2. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 540. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 

External links[edit]