Sue Thomas (author)

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Sue Thomas
Suethomas 2006.jpg
Born July 16, 1951 (1951-07-16)
Leicestershire
Occupation Writer / independent scholar
Website
http://www.suethomas.net

Sue Thomas (born 1951) is an English author and independent scholar. She is also a Visiting Fellow in the Media School at Bournemouth University.

Her most recent book is Technobiophilia: nature and cyberspace.[1] The non-fiction travelogue of cyberspace Hello World: travels in virtuality was published in 2004.[2] Her first novel Correspondence [3] was short-listed for the Arthur C Clarke Award for Best Science Fiction Novel in 1993. She has published extensively in both print and online, and has initiated numerous online writing projects including The Noon Quilt, now an iconic image of the early days of the web. She is known for her innovative work on Transliteracy.

Until July 2013 she was Professor of New Media in the Institute of Creative Technologies, Faculty of Art, Design and Humanities at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. She founded the trAce Online Writing Centre at Nottingham Trent University in 1995 and was Artistic Director until going to De Montfort in 2005. She has managed a number of social media projects including the NLab Network, CreativeCoffee Club, and Amplified Leicester, a city-wide experiment in social media.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Correspondence, The Women's Press (UK) Tusk/Overlook Press (USA)(1992) (novel. Short-listed for the Arthur C. Clarke Award for Best Science Fiction Novel 1993
  • Water, Tusk/Overlook Press (USA) Five Leaves Press (UK)(1994) (novel)
  • Wild Women: Contemporary Short Stories By Women Celebrating Women (1994) (fiction anthology)
  • Creative Writing: A Handbook For Workshop Leaders University of Nottingham Press (1995) (nonfiction)
  • Hello World: Travels in Virtuality Raw Nerve (2004) (travel / autobiography)
  • Technobiophilia: nature and cyberspace Bloomsbury (2013) (nonfiction)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas, Sue (2013). Technobiophilia: nature and cyberspace. London: Bloomsbury Academic. 
  2. ^ McClellan, Jim (29 July 2004). "Blurring the boundaries". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 February 2011. 
  3. ^ Thomas, Sue (1992). Correspondence. London: The Womens Press. 

External links[edit]