Sulaiman Khan Karrani

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Sulaiman Khan Karrani (reigned: 1566–1572) was a ruler of Bengal since the death of his elder brother Taj Khan Karrani.[1] According to the Riyaz-us-Salatin, he shifted the seat of government from Gaur to Tanda.[2]

Sulaiman, his brother Taj and Sulaiman's sons Bayazid and Daud Khan Karrani ran a short-lived Afghan vassal state of Mughal emperor Akbar in Bengal. They dominated the area while Sulaiman paid homage to the Akbar. The Afghans defeated by Akbar began to flock under his flag. The Afghans were not technically the rulers of Bengal, the post was primarily nominal.

Relation with Akbar[edit]

Sulaiman Khan Karrani did not establish his own coinage during his reign, an act that would have been tantamount to declaring statehood to the ruling Mughals.[1] He also honored Akbar as the supreme ruler of Bengal by requiring that mosques read Akbar's name in the Khutbah, the sermon at the Friday congregational prayers in Bengal.[1] Historians cite these acts as keeping the diplomatic peace between Bengal and Mughal Empire during Akbar's lifetime.[1]

Conquest of Orissa[edit]

Though northern India and parts of southern India were ruled by the Muslim rulers, they had not yet been able to conquer Orissa. In 1568 Sulaiman Khan sent his son Bayazid Khan Karrani and the famous general Kala Pahar against the last Orissan Gajapati king Mukunda Deva. After a few major battles against the Orissans, and aided by civil war elsewhere in Orissa, Sulaiman was able to bring the entire area under his rule. Kalapahar sacked the Jagannath temple and took Puri under control. Sulaiman Karrani appointed Lodi Khan and Qutlu Khan Lohani governors of Orissa and Puri respectively.[3]

Conquest of Koch Bihar[edit]

Sulaiman Khan Karrani then sent general Kala Pahar against the Kamata (later Koch Bihar under the Mughals) king Vishwa Singha. Kala Pahar crossed the Brahmaputra River and advanced as far as Tejpur (modern-day Dinajpur District, Bangladesh). Kala Pahar defeated and captured the Kamata general Shukladhwaja, third son of Bishwa Singha.

Death and succession[edit]

After a tranquil and peaceful ruling for seven years Sulaiman Karrani died in 11 October 1572, leaving his empire to his son, Bayazid Khan Karrani.

Religion[edit]

Sulaiman was a pious Muslim living a life observing all religious rituals. He built the Sona mosque in old Maldah.[3]

The historian `Abd al-Qadir Bada'uni mentions that every morning Sulaiman would hold a devotional meeting with 150 Shaikhs and Ulama and only thereafter would go about transaction of state business [4]


Preceded by
Taj Khan Karrani
Karrani dynasty
1566-1572
Succeeded by
Bayazid Khan Karrani

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Hasan, Perween; Grabar, Oleg (2007). Sultans and Mosques: The Early Muslim Architecture of Bangladesh. I. B.Tauris & Company, Limited. ISBN 978-1-84511-381-0. 
  2. ^ Eaton, Richard M. (1993). The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier, 1204-1760. Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 140–2. ISBN 0-520-20507-3. 
  3. ^ a b Sulaiman Khan Karrani in Banglapedia
  4. ^ Abul Fazl Allami (translated by H. Blochman) (1873). Ain i Akbari. Calcutta.