Sun-rising (hieroglyph)

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N28
Rising Sun
(Coronation of
King, Pharaoh)
in hieroglyphs
N28
D36
 
 
Aa1
D36
Rising Sun
(variations-Khā)
in hieroglyphs

The ancient Egyptian "Rising sun" hieroglyph is one of the oldest language hieroglyphs from Ancient Egypt. It was used by Pharaoh Khasekhemwy-( 'Khā-sekhem' ) of the 2nd dynasty in composing his name. The hieroglyph is also used to represent: "Coronation", and its basic meaning related to festivals, parades, rejoicing, etc., and the sun arising each day is: "rejoice".

Language usage of "Rising sun"-(Khā)[edit]

Khasekhemwy, Pharaoh of 2nd Dynasty.
Serekh, using the Horus–falcon, and the Set-animal (hieroglyph).
(for his name: rising sun: Kha + sekhemwy.

The basic usage of the Rising sun symbol is as the language equivalent: "khā", and is used to refer to "risings", "splendours", "coronations"; also the related word "crowns". The alternate hieroglyphic spelling with the sieve (hieroglyph) shows its other language variety, in a Composite hieroglyph block word.

Rosetta Stone usage[edit]

Line 11 of the Rosetta Stone refers to an event, one of the ten ways that the honoring of Pharaoh Ptolemy V is to be done:

"There shall be celebrated a festival and 'a day of rejoicing'-(Khā), in the temples of Egypt, all of them, of the King of the South and the North, Ptolemy, the everliving, of Ptah, beloved, the god appearing-(epiphanous), lord of benefits-(eucharistos-Greek), yearly, beginning in..."[1]

In the Rosetta Stone, the second half of the decree, the Decree of Memphis (Ptolemy V), the Rising Sun (hieroglyph) is used six times, in lines: R-4, 7, 10-(twice), 11, and 13; all uses are related to either festivals, or erecting/constructing a statue.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Budge, The Rosetta Stone, p. 165.