Sunburst Award

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The Sunburst Award for Canadian Literature of the Fantastic is an annual award given for a speculative fiction novel or a book-length collection.

History[edit]

The name of the award comes from the title of the first novel by Phyllis Gotlieb, Sunburst (1964).

The first award was given out in 2001. The award consists of a cash prize (C$1,000 in 2001-2005) and a medallion. The winner is selected by a jury; a new jury is struck each year.

List of past award winners[edit]

Year Winner Work title
2001 Sean Stewart Galveston
2002 Margaret Sweatman When Alice Lay Down with Peter
2003 Nalo Hopkinson Skin Folk
2004 Cory Doctorow A Place So Foreign and 8 More
2005 Geoff Ryman Air
2006 Holly Phillips In the Palace of Repose
2007 Mark Frutkin Fabrizio's Return
2008 Nalo Hopkinson The New Moon's Arms
2009 Andrew Davidson The Gargoyle
2010 Adult: A. M. Dellamonica
Young adult: Hiromi Goto
Indigo Springs
Half World
2011 Adult: Guy Gavriel Kay
Young adult: Paul Glennon
Under Heaven
Bookweirder[1]
2012 Adult: Geoff Ryman
Young adult: Catherine Austen
Paradise Tales
All Good Children
2013 Adult: Martine Desjardins
Young adult: Rachel Hartman
Maleficium
Seraphina

Eligibility[edit]

Sunburst Award administrator and jury use the broadest possible definition of speculative fiction for eligibility purposes: "science fiction, fantasy, magic realism, horror, surrealism, fantastique, myth and legend, fantastical storytelling, and any other writing beyond the strictly realistic". To be eligible for the award, a work must be published between January 1 and December 31 of the previous year. Only Canadian citizens and landed immigrants are eligible, however there are no Canadian residency requirements, and three of the five awards presented to date have gone to expatriates (Stewart, Doctorow, Ryman).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Strock, Ian Randall (September 15, 2011). "2011 Sunburst Award Winners". SFScope.com. Archived from the original on September 18, 2011. Retrieved September 18, 2011. 

External links[edit]