Sunol, California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sunol
census-designated place
Historic Sunol Train Depot, on  the Niles Canyon Railway
Historic Sunol Train Depot, on the Niles Canyon Railway
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Location in Alameda County and the state of California
Coordinates: 37°35′40″N 121°53′19″W / 37.59444°N 121.88861°W / 37.59444; -121.88861Coordinates: 37°35′40″N 121°53′19″W / 37.59444°N 121.88861°W / 37.59444; -121.88861
Country  United States
State  California
County Alameda
Government
 • State Senate Mark DeSaulnier (D)[1]
 • State Assembly Bill Quirk (D)[2]
 • U. S. Congress Eric Swalwell (D)[3]
Area[4]
 • Total 27.764 sq mi (71.909 km2)
 • Land 27.751 sq mi (71.874 km2)
 • Water 0.013 sq mi (0.034 km2)  0.05%
Elevation[5] 266 ft (81 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 913
 • Density 33/sq mi (13/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 94586
Area code(s) 925, 510
FIPS code 06-77042
GNIS feature IDs 1670341, 2410033

Sunol (formerly, Sunolglen) is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) in Alameda County, California, United States. The population was 913 at the 2010 census.

The small, rural town of Sunol located along Niles Canyon is well known for its historic railroad system, on which the tourist railroad Niles Canyon Railway makes an in-town stop and the Altamont Commuter Express passes en route to San Jose and the Central Valley.

History[edit]

The first Sunol post office opened in 1871 and the name was changed to Sunolglen the same year.[6] The name reverted to Sunol in 1920.[6] The town's name is in honor of Antonio Suñol, part owner of the historical Rancho Valle de San Jose land grant that once contained the site of the town.[6]

Geography[edit]

Sunol is located adjacent to two railroads and lies near the crossroads of Interstate 680 and State Route 84. These connect Sunol with Fremont to the south and west, Pleasanton to the north, and Livermore to the northeast. Sunol sits 17 miles (27 km) north the center of San Jose and 32 miles (51 km) southeast of San Francisco.

The town lies near Alameda Creek at the northwest edge of the Sunol Valley. The San Antonio Reservoir lies 3 miles (4.8 km) to Sunol's east, and the Calaveras Reservoir lies 8 miles (13 km) south of the town.

North of the town is the locale of Kilkare Woods, accessible only through Sunol.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the Sunol CDP has a total area of 27.8 square miles (72 km2), of which 99.95% is land and 0.05% is water.

Demographics[edit]

2010 Census data[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[7] reported that Sunol had a population of 913. The population density was 32.9 people per square mile (12.7/km²). The racial makeup of Sunol was 780 (85.4%) White, 1 (0.1%) African American, 6 (0.7%) Native American, 48 (5.3%) Asian, 7 (0.8%) Pacific Islander, 19 (2.1%) from other races, and 52 (5.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 91 persons (10.0%).

The Census reported that 100% of the population lived in households.

There were 362 households, out of which 76 (21.0%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 228 (63.0%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 20 (5.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 9 (2.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 16 (4.4%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 5 (1.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 81 households (22.4%) were made up of individuals and 24 (6.6%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52. There were 257 families (71.0% of all households); the average family size was 2.90.

The population was spread out with 148 people (16.2%) under the age of 18, 74 people (8.1%) aged 18 to 24, 164 people (18.0%) aged 25 to 44, 377 people (41.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 150 people (16.4%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49.3 years. For every 100 females there were 101.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.8 males.

There were 394 housing units at an average density of 14.2 per square mile (5.5/km²), of which 272 (75.1%) were owner-occupied, and 90 (24.9%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.1%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.1%. 708 people (77.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 205 people (22.5%) lived in rental housing units.

2000 Census data[edit]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 1,332 people, 483 households, and 368 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 40.6 people per square mile (15.7/km²). There were 503 housing units at an average density of 15.3 per square mile (5.9/km²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 84.46% White, 0.98% Native American, 4.80% Asian, 0.23% Pacific Islander, 4.13% from other races, and 5.41% from two or more races. 8.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 483 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.3% were married couples living together, 5.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 17.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the CDP the population was 22.7% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 106.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.4 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $88,353, and the median income for a family was $96,121. Males had a median income of $77,666 versus $37,102 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $45,773. None of the families and 1.4% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64.

Area attractions[edit]

Open air round, marble structure resting on a layered base with twelve columns supporting the round, marble roof. There are leafless trees in the background.
The Sunol Water Temple
  • The Sunol Water Temple is an unusual Roman-inspired structure where three water mains converge before being piped to San Francisco.
  • Elliston Vineyards. Offers wine tasting on the weekends, and is a popular wedding destination.
  • The Niles Canyon Railway Sunol Depot was built in 1884, and is the last surviving example of a Southern Pacific standard design known as a "One-Story Combination Depot #7." The building has been restored and is operated by the Pacific Locomotive Association.
  • Niles Canyon Road runs westward from Sunol and is a scenic 7-mile (11 km) drive to Fremont.
  • A statue of Bosco, the dog elected mayor,[9] sits in front of the Post Office.[10] Bosco achieved a degree of international notoriety in 1990 when the Chinese newspaper People's Daily reported on his tenure as an alleged example of the failings of the American electoral process.[11]
  • In 2007, Songwriter Will Stratton released a song named after the town on his first album.[12]
  • Sunol Regional Wilderness
  • Sunol Valley Golf Club, home to the Cypress & Palm golf course

School district[edit]

The Sunol Glen School, a kindergarten-through-eighth-grade public school that is also its own school district serves the community of Sunol. High school age children are served by Foothill High School in nearby Pleasanton.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  3. ^ "California's 15th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 9, 2013. 
  4. ^ U.S. Census
  5. ^ "Sunol". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  6. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 710. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  7. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ Teresa Brown (November 29, 2002). "Welcome to Sunol" (PDF). Pleasanton Weekly. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  10. ^ "Bay Area's First Canine Mayor Memorialized". NBC Bay Area (San Jose, California: NBCUniversal). 17 December 2008. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  11. ^ George Lewis (February 26, 1990). "Sunol, California / Dogmocracy / Bosco The Dog". NBC Evening News. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  12. ^ Erik Hage (May 1, 2007). "What the Night Said". Allmusic.com. Retrieved 2009-07-20. 

External links[edit]