Sunshine (Jonathan Edwards song)

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"Sunshine"
Single by Jonathan Edwards
from the album Jonathan Edwards
Released 1971
Format Single
Recorded 1971
Genre Country folk, Pop
Length 2:16
Label Capricorn
Writer(s) Jonathan Edwards
Producer(s) Peter Casperson
Certification Gold

"Sunshine" is a country folk song from 1971 by Jonathan Edwards, released as the first single from his debut album Jonathan Edwards. The single reached Billboard #4[1] and earned a gold record.[2]

"Sunshine" was not originally planned for release, but when an engineer accidentally erased the master of a track called "Please Find Me" near the end of sessions for the album, "Sunshine" was used to fill the hole.[2]

"Sunshine" was released as a single and caught fire first[citation needed]on Boston radio, then nationwide, hitting #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on January 15, 1972[1] and earning a gold record.[2] Here's Edwards' take on its success: "It was just at the time of the Vietnam War and Nixon. It was looking bad out there. That song meant a lot to a lot of people during that time--especially me."[2]

Chart positions[edit]

Chart (1972) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 4
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks[3] 7
  • Jonathan Edwards recorded and released a bluegrass version of "Sunshine" (along with an entire album) with the band "The Seldom Scene."[when?]

Covers[edit]

In 1980, Juice Newton scored a Top-40 hit, peaking at #35 on the Billboard Country chart with her version of "Sunshine".[4]

Susanna Hoffs (of the Bangles) recorded a version of the song for her first solo album in 1991, but the cut did not get chosen for the final pressing and remains unreleased.

Paul Westerberg's cover is featured on the Friends TV show soundtrack.

The Isley Brothers also cut a version of this song; it may be found on their 3 + 3 album.

The song is featured within the film Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy and is also included on the film's soundtrack.

"Sunshine" was featured in an episode of Aaron Sorkin's The Newsroom (U.S. TV series) (Season 1, Episode 7 "5/1"), where Will MacAvoy and Jim Harper perform it together at Will's party for the staff.

In July 2007, the original Jonathan Edwards recording joined the list of 1960s protest songs used to sell high-end consumer products when it was used as the only audio in a Jeep television spot, part of the Heritage campaign developed by the Cutwater agency.[5] Cutwater was, however, unable to explain how a song released in 1971 was a 60's protest song.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Billboard Jan 15, 1972". Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2007-09-04. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Jonathan Edwards bio". Archived from the original on 2007-07-13. Retrieved 2007-09-04. 
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2002). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-2001. Record Research. p. 85. 
  4. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944-2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 248. 
  5. ^ "Cutwater". Retrieved 2007-09-04. 

External links[edit]