Supernova (Lisa Lopes album)

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Supernova
Studio album by Lisa Lopes
Released August 14, 2001 (2001-08-14)
(see release history)
Recorded October 11, 2000 — April 8, 2001
Genre Hip hop
Label Arista
Producer Lisa Lopes, Antonio "LA" Reid, & Mark Pitts
Lisa Lopes chronology
Supernova
(2001)
N.I.N.A
(2002)
Singles from Supernova
  1. "The Block Party"
    Released: July 8, 2001
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 2.5/5 stars[1]
MTV Asia 8/10 stars[2]
Slant 3.5/5 stars[3]

Supernova is the first solo studio album by Lisa Lopes of TLC.

Album information[edit]

The album was originally going to be entitled "A New Star is Born", but was immediately changed to Supernova. The album was not released in the United States due to poor sales and mixed reactions, although it was released in other countries. The first single, "The Block Party", was sent to radio in the summer of 2001, becoming a top 20 hit in the U.K., but it did not perform well in the U.S. singles chart. The second single would have been "Hot!", as was made clear at the end of her music video. However, when the album release was canceled in the United States, all further singles were canceled. The promo single for "Hot!" would later be leaked online in October 2001. Though the album was canceled by Arista, Lopes tried selling the album on her website Eyenetics, but to no success. Since the album was not released in the United States, Lopes had already started to work on new material before her death in 2002.

The intended release date for the album was August 16, 2001—the day of her father's birthday, As well as her grandfather's death. This is alluded to in the lyrics of the song "A New Star Is Born". The release date of the album was ultimately pushed back several times.

The album was remixed for Lopes' second solo album, N.I.N.A in 2002. The album was cancelled after Lopes' death, but was leaked online in 2011.

The album was re-released in a remixed form in 2009 as Eye Legacy.

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Life Is Like a Park" (featuring Carl Thomas) 4:03
2. "Hot!"   4:12
3. "The Block Party"   4:04
4. "Let Me Live"   3:53
5. "Jenny" (featuring Jazze Pha) 6:07
6. "I Believe in Me"   4:17
7. "Rags to Riches" (featuring Andre Rison) 4:32
8. "True Confessions" (featuring Angela Hunte) 3:53
9. "Untouchable" (featuring 2Pac) 5:34
10. "Head to the Sky" (featuring Blaque) 4:14
11. "The Universal Quest" (featuring Esthero) 5:51
12. "A New Star Is Born" (featuring Tangi Forman and 2Pac) 4:39
13. "Breathe" (featuring Grant Geissman and Tangi Forman; Unlisted Track) 4:25
Japanese bonus track
No. Title Length
13. "Friends" (featuring Cassandra Lucas) 4:45
  • Note: "True Confessions" does not appear on the Japan release.

B-sides[edit]

Outtakes/Leftover Tracks[edit]

Lisa has stated in a radio interview that 25 songs were written for the album, and that only half of them were recorded.[4] Most of the unreleased tracks were either leaked online, or remixed on "Eye Legacy".

  • "Bounce" (featuring Chamillionaire and Bone Crusher)
    • Released on "Eye Legacy"
  • "Crank It" (featuring Tangi Forman)
    • Leaked;[5] originally recorded in July 1998, Released on "Eye Legacy" with guest vocals from Reigndrop Lopes.
  • "Cherry Cherry" (featuring Mr. Drick)
    • Leaked;[6] originally recorded in July 1998, remixed on the Japan-exclusive version of "Eye Legacy".
  • "Left Pimpin" (featuring Brett)
    • Leaked;[7] released online for Lisa's second solo album, N.I.N.A.. The song was later sampled for the song "Quickie", which is featured on TLC's fourth album, 3D.
  • "Neva Will Eye Eva" (featuring Raina "Reigndrop" Lopes)
    • Released on "Eye Legacy"
  • "Through the Pain" (featuring Ryan Toby and Claudette Ortiz)
    • Released on "Eye Legacy". The first verse of this track was later re-recorded for the song "Who's it Gonna Be", for the Japanese-exclusive import of TLC's fourth album "3D".

Release history[edit]

Region Date
United Kingdom August 14, 2001
Australia November 12, 2001
China March 12, 2002
Japan January 28, 2003

References[edit]