Superzoom

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This article is about lenses for single-lens reflex (SLR) cameras. For non-SLR digital cameras with large focal length zoom lenses, see Bridge camera.

The term superzoom or hyperzoom refers to photographic zoom lenses with unconventionally large focal length factors, typically more than 5× or even ranging beyond 15×. The largest ratio for a digital SLR camera lens is held by the Tamron Di-II format (APS-C) 16–300 mm, giving 18.8×.[1] Some bridge digital cameras have even larger zoom ratios up to 60× and the non-detachable lens compact cameras with same sensor size 1/2.3" as the bridge camera have superzoom up to 30×.[2][3] The Samsung Galaxy S4 zoom smartphone has optical zoom lens 10x with "zoom ring" and optical image stabilization,[4] For movie and television use, Panavision holds the record with their 300X (7-2100mm, 23-7000mm 35mm equivalent) HD Lens with Compound Zoom Technology (two or more lenses mounted together).[5]

While superzoom lenses have improved greatly in recent years, they still have a number of drawbacks in comparison with shorter-range zooms and prime lenses, chiefly their typically smaller maximum aperture. DxO Labs has demonstrated that the best sharpness of a zoom lens can be at the wide-end, at the long-end or in the middle of the zoom range depending on the camera processor and not on the lens itself.[citation needed]

The longer the zoom lens, the greater the possibility of vignetting when using the wide and widest angles, especially if optical filter(s) are attached to the front of the lens. Even at the longest range, falloff (darkened corners) can be seen. The magnitude of vignetting and falloff depends on the apertures. Opening a smaller diaphragm will usually reduce vignetting and falloff, but as a consequence of loss of ample light and loss of broad/deep depth-of-field.[6]

History and development[edit]

Sigma Superzoom 18-200mm/3.5-6.3 DC Lens attached to the Canon EOS 400D.

The first zoom for photo cameras was introduced by Voigtländer in 1959 (Voigtländer ZOOMAR 1:2,8/36–82 mm). It was in fact designed by an independent lensmaker Zommar from Long Island, New York.

That same year Nikon introduced a Nikkor 85–250 mm/1:4.0-4.5 for the new Nikon F.

The first zoom affordable for amateurs was the Vivitar series I 1:3.5/70–210 mm of 1973, with a breathtaking for its time focal length range. Other superzoom lenses included a 100–500 mm/1:8 Rokkor from Minolta and a 360-1200/1:11 Nikkor from 1976.

In 1980 Tokina brought a wide-angle-to-zoom with the enormous focal length range of 1:4.0/28–85 mm to the market. Only two years later Tokina presented the first super zoom shot, for that time, which covered a focal length spectrum from 35–200 mm (1982).

The focal length range was again increased in 1985, when Kiron presented the first zoom lens with a focal length range of 28–210 mm.

Models[edit]

Following is a list of super zoom lenses; unless otherwise noted, these are used for 135 format in SLRs and full-frame DSLRs or for APS-C format in DSLRs. The minimal factor used here is more than 5×. A 28–200 mm has a 75° to 12.3° angle of view, a 28–300 mm (or an 18–200 mm for an APS-C DSLR) has 75° to 8.2°. Between parenthesis are the Photodo rating, if any.

Canon[edit]

  • EF-S 15–85 mm f3.5–5.6 IS USM, 17 elements in 12 groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22–38 min, 35 cm close focus, 1:5 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø81.5×87.5 mm, 575 g
  • EF-S 17–85 mm f/4–5.6 IS USM, 17 elements in 12 groups, 6 diaphragm blades, f/22–32 min, 35 cm close focus, 1:5 magnification, 67 mm filter, ø78.5×92 mm, 475 g
  • Canon EF-S 18–135mm:
    • f/3.5-5.6 IS, 16 elements in 12 groups, 6 diaphragm blades, f/22-38 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:5 magnification, 67 mm filter, ø75.4×101 mm, 455 g
    • f/3.5-5.6 IS STM, 16 elements in 12 groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22-38 min, 39 cm close focus, 1:3.6 magnification, 67 mm filter, ø77×96 mm, 480 g
  • EF-S 18-200/3.5-5.6 IS, 16 elements in 12 groups, 6 diaphragm blades, f/22-36 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:4.2 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø79×102 mm, 600 g
  • EF 28-200/3.5-5.6 USM, 16 elements in 12 groups, 6 diaphragm blades, ultrasonic autofocus (non-USM version is available outside Japan), f/22-36 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:3.6 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø78.4×89.6 mm, 500 g
  • EF 28-300/3.5-5.6L IS USM, 23 elements in 16 groups, 8 circular diaphragm blades, f/22-40 min, 70 cm close focus distance, 1:3.3 magnification, Ring USM AF, Image Stabilisation, 77 mm filter, ø92×184 mm, 1,670g
  • EF 35-350/3.5-5.6L USM (3.3), 21 elements in 15 groups, 8 diaphragm Blades, ultrasonic autofocus, f/22-32 min, 60 cm close focus, 1:4 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø85×167.4 mm, 1385 g, Discontinued

Cosina[edit]

also sold under Phoenix Corporation brand

  • 28-210/4.2-6.5 IF Aspherical (2.4), 15 elements in 13 groups, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:6.8 magnification, 67 mm filter, 395 g, Ø72×92,5 mm, replaced the older 28-210/3,5-5,6 (2.1)
  • 28-300/4.0-6.3 (1.6), 17 elements in 15 groups, 77 mm filter, 1.9 m close focus, multicoated lenses, 570 g, f/16 min, 1:5.5 magnification, Ø82×122 mm, sliding zoom

Kiron[edit]

  • 28-210/3.8-5.6 1:4 magnification, 72 mm filter

Minolta AF[edit]

Nikkor[edit]

  • AF-S DX 18-135 mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED, 15 elements including one ED glass and two aspherical in 13 groups, 7 rounded diaphragm blades, f/22-38 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:4.1 magnification, 385 g, ø73.5×86.5 mm, 67 mm filters
  • AF-S DX VR 18-200/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR II, 16 elements including two ED glass three aspherical in 12 groups, super integrated coating, enhanced vibration reduction, silent wave motor AF, 7 rounded diaphragm blades, f/22-36 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:4.5 magnification, 72 mm filters, ø77×96.5 mm, 565 g
  • AF-S DX 18–300mm f/3.5–5.6G ED VR, 19 elements including three ED glass and three aspherical in 16 groups, super integrated coating, enhanced vibration reduction, silent wave motor AF, 9 diaphragm blades, f/22-32 min, 45 cm close focus (at 300mm), 1:3.1 magnification, 77 mm filters, ø83×120 mm, 830 g
  • AF-S VR 24-120/3.5-5.6G IF-ED, 15 elements in 13 groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:4.8 magnification, 72 mm filters, ø77×94 mm, 575 g; launched january 2003, supersedes the AF 24-120/3.5-5.6D IF
  • 28-200/3,5-5,6D IF (2.6) launched in March 1998, 16 elements in 13 groups, 85 cm close focus, f/22 min, internal focusing, 72 mm filters, ø78×86.5 mm, 555 g
  • AF 28-200/3.5-5.6G IF-ED, 12 elements including 3 ED glass and 3 aspherical in 11 groups, 7 rounded diaphragm blades, f/22-36 min, 44 cm close focus, 1:3.2 magnification, 62 mm filters, ø69.5×71 mm, 360 g
  • 35-200/3.5-f/4.5s macro, 17 elements in 13 groups, 30 cm close focus, 1:4 magnification, ø70×139 mm, 52 mm filters, 740 g, introduced in 1985, phased out in 1999. See mir.com.my/rb/photography
  • 50–300 mm f/4.5, 20 elements in 13 groups, f/22 min, 250 cm close focus, 95 mm filters, ø98mm×292 mm, 2300 g, introduced in 1966, Ai coupling since 1977; replaced by (s) version, ED, 15 elements in 11 groups, f/32 min, 1:6.9 magnification (Ai-S), 95 mm filters, ø98mm×247 mm, 2200 g then 1950 g (Ai-S), introduced 1977, Ai-S version 1982. See mir.com.my/rb/photography
  • AF VR 80-400/4.5-5.6D ED, 17 including 3 ED glass elements in 11 groups, Vibration Reduction, 9 diaphragm blades, f/32 min, 230 cm close focus, 1:4.8 magnification, 77 mm filters, ø91×171 mm, 1210 g, 2000 release
  • AF-S 80-400/4.5-5.6D ED VR, 20 including 3 ED glass elements and 1 Super ED element in 12 groups, Vibration Reduction, 9 diaphragm blades, f/32–40 min, 175 cm close focus, 1:5 magnification, 77 mm filters, ø95.5×203 mm, 1570 g; 2013 release
  • Nikon 1 Nikkor VR 10-100mm f/4.5-5.6 PD-Zoom, for the 1 series' unique CX format (crop factor 2.7), integrates an unseen amount of technologies: 21 elements in 14 groups including 1 High Refractive Index (HRI), 3 Extra-low Dispersion (ED) and 2 aspherical lenses, Super Integrated Coating (SIC), internal focusing (IF) with quiet ultra-fast Voice Coil motor (VCM), silent 3-speed PD-Zoom, Vibration Reduction (VR II), retractable lens mechanism and 7 rounded diaphragm blades.[7][8] Together with the Canon EF 28-300mm lens it is the only current superzoom with 20 elements or more.

Olympus Corporation[edit]

  • 18-180/3.5-6.3 Zuiko digital ED, 15 elements in 13 groups, 45 cm close focus, 7 blades diaphragm, 1:4,3 magnification, 62 mm filters, Ø78×84.5 mm, 435 g. Four Thirds (crop factor 2.0).

Pentax[edit]

Sigma Corporation[edit]

  • 18-125/3.5-5.6 DC, 15 elements in 14 groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:5.3 magnification, 62 mm filters, ø70×77.7 mm, 385 g
  • 18-200/3.5-6.3 DC, 15 elements in 13 groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:4.4 magnification, 62 mm filters, ø70×78.1 mm, 405 g
  • 18-200/3.5-6.3 DC OS, 18 Elements in 13 Groups, 7 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 45 cm close focus, 1:3.9 magnification, 72 mm filters, ø79×100 mm, 610 g. In January 2009 Sigma announced a new version of this lens extending the range to 18-250
  • 24-135 mm F2.8-4.5, 16 elements in 15 groups, 9 diaphragm blades, f/32 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:4.5 magnification, 77 mm filters, ø83.6×93.4 mm, 535 g
  • 28-200/3.5-5.6 DG Macro 16 elements in 14 groups, 8 blades diaphragm, f/22 min, 48 cm close focus, 1:3.8 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø70×77.7 mm, 400 g, replacing the 28-200/3,8-5,6 Aspherical UC and the 28-200/3,5-5,6 Asph. Hyperzoom (2.7)
  • 28-300/3.5-6.3 DG Macro, 15 elements in 13 groups, 8 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 50 cm close focus, 1:3 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø74×86 mm, 490 g, replacing the 28-300/3,5-5,6 DL (2.7)
  • 80-400/4.5-5.6 EX DG OS, 20 elements in 14 groups, 9 blades diaphragm, f/32 min, 180 cm close focus, 1:5 magnification, 77 mm filters, ø95×192 mm, 1750 g
  • APO 50-500/4-6.3 EX DG /HSM, 20 elements in 16 groups, 9 diaphragm blades, f/22 min, 100–300 cm close focus, 1:5.2 magnification, 86 mm filters, ø95×218.5 mm, 1840 g. This large and heavy lens has earned the nickname "Bigma".

Sony[edit]

  • SAL-18250 18-250mm DT Lens,[9] f/3.5-6.3 aperture,3 Apheric Elements, ED (Extra- low Dispersion) Glass, 16 elements in 13 groups, Max magnification of 0.29,Circular Apperture(7 Blades), Angle of View(APS-C) 76.6゚-30゚, Filter Diameter: 62mm
  • SAL-18200 18-200mm DT Lens,[10] f/3.5-6.3 aperture, ED (Extra-low Dispersion Glass), 15 elements in 13 groups, Max magnification of 0.27, Circular Aperture(7 Blades), Angle of View(APS-C) 76゚-8゚, Filter Diameter: 62mm

Tamron[edit]

  • AF 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD MACRO (Model B016), 16 elements in 12 groups, 39 cm close focus, 1:2.9 magnification, 67 mm filter, ø75×100 mm, 540 g, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22–40 min
  • AF 18-200/3.5-6.3 XR Di-II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro (Model A14), 15 elements in 13 groups, 45 cm close focus, 1:3.7 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø73.8×83.7 mm, 398 g, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22 min
  • AF 18–200mm F/3.5-6.3 Di III VC (Model B011), 17 elements in 13 groups, 50 cm close focus, 1:3.7 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø 68.0×102.0 mm, 460 g, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22–40 min. For Sony E-mount MILCs.
  • AF 18-250 mm F/3.5-6.3 Di-II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro (model A18), f/22 min, 7 blades diaphragm, 16 elements in 13 groups, 45 cm close focus, 1:3.5 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø74.4×84.3 mm, 430 g
  • AF 18-270 mm F/3.5–6.3 Di-II VC LD Aspherical (IF) Macro (model B003), f/22min, 7 blades diaphragm, 18 elements in 13 groups, 49 cm close focus, 1:3.5 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø79.6×101.0 mm, 550 g. Discontinued; replaced by model B008.
  • AF 18-270 mm F/3.5–6.3 Di II VC PZD (model B008), f/22–40 min, 7 blades diaphragm, 16 elements in 13 groups, 49 cm close focus, 1:3.8 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø74.4×96.4 mm, 450 g
  • SP AF 24-135/3.5-5.6 AD Aspherical [IF] Macro (Model 190D), 14 elements in 10 groups, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22 min, 0.4 m close focus, 1:3.3 magnification, 72 mm filter, 530 g, ø78.5×80.6 mm
  • AF 28-200/3.8-5.6 Super Zoom XR Aspherical (IF) Macro (Model A03) 15 elements in 14 groups, 7 blades diaphragm, f/22 min, 0.49 m close focus, 1:4 magnification, 62 mm filter, 354 g, ø71×75.2 mm; replaced the 28-200/3,8-5,6 LD (IF) Aspherical Super (2.7)
  • AF 28-300 mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) Macro (Model A061), 15 elements in 13 groups, 0.49 m close focus, 1:2.9 magnification, 62 mm filter, ø73×83.7 mm, 420 g, 9 blades diaphragm, f/22 min; replaced the 28-300/3,5-6,3 LD Aspherical (IF) (2.6)

Tokina[edit]

  • 17-135/3.5-5.6 DX
  • 24-200/3.5-5.6 AT-X 242 AF, 15 elements in 13 groups including two aspherical and two SD glass, multi-layer coatings, internal focusing, rotary zoom, 6 blades diaphragm, f/22 min, 80 cm close focus, 1:5.97 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø81.8×89 mm, 690 g
  • 28-200/3.5-5.3 SZ-X 282 MF, f/22 min, 15 elements in 12 groups, 135 cm close focus, 1:5.5 magnification, 72 mm filter, ø74×109 mm, 690 g
  • 35-200/4-5,6 (2.5), the first trans-standard superzoom launched in 1982.[11]
  • 35-300/4,5-6,7 (0.3)
  • 80-400/4.5-5.6 AT-X840 AF D, 16 elements in 10 groups including one SD glass, f/32 min, multi-layer coatings, 250 cm close focus, 1:5.4 magnification, rotary zoom, 8 diaphragm blades, 72 mm filters, ø77.2×136.5, 1020 g, replacing the previous AT-X 840 AF-II

Vivitar[edit]

  • 28-210/3,5-5,6 (0.9)
  • 28-300/4-6,3 Series 1 (1.3)
  • 28-200/3,8-5,6

References[edit]