Sur Baher

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Sur Baher
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • Also spelled Sur Bahr (official)
Arabic transcription(s)
 • Arabic صور باهر
Sur Baher
Sur Baher
Sur Baher is located in Israel
Sur Baher
Sur Baher
Coordinates: 31°44′14″N 35°13′59″E / 31.73722°N 35.23306°E / 31.73722; 35.23306Coordinates: 31°44′14″N 35°13′59″E / 31.73722°N 35.23306°E / 31.73722; 35.23306
District Jerusalem
Population (2006)
 • Total 15,000
Name meaning The wall of Bahir (Prominent)[1]
Sur Baher

Sur Baher (Arabic صور باهر, Hebrew צור באהר) is a Palestinian neighborhood on the southeastern outskirts of East Jerusalem. It is located east of Ramat Rachel and northeast of the Har Homa Israeli settlement. In 2006, Sur Baher had a population of 15,000.[2]

History[edit]

In 1596, it appeared in Ottoman tax registers as "Sur Bahir", a village in the Nahiya of Quds in the Liwa of Quds. It had a population of 29 households, all Muslim, and paid taxes on wheat barley, vineyards and fruit trees, goats and beehives.[3]

French explorer Victor Guérin visited the place in 1863, and described Sur Baher as having about 400 inhabitants.[4] An Ottoman village list of about 1870 found 46 houses and a population of 154, though the population count included only men. It further noted that it was an old, well-built and nice-looking village.[5] In 1883, it was described as "a stone village of moderate size, on a bare hill. On the north is a well in the valley, and there are rock-cut tombs above it to the west."[6]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Sur Baher had an all Muslim population of 993 persons.[7] In the 1931 census the population of Sur Bahir was a total of 1529, still all Muslim, in 308 inhabited houses.[8]

In 1945 the population of Sur Baher, together with Umm Tuba, was 2,450, all Arabs, who owned 8,915 dunams of land according to an official land and population survey.[9] 911 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 3,927 used for cereals,[10] while 56 dunams were built-up (urban) land.[11]

During the 1948 Arab-Israeli War Sur Baher was captured by Jordanian forces, and became a part of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan until the Six-Day War in 1967, when it was captured by Israel.

Development projects[edit]

In 2000, the Israeli government and Jerusalem municipality approved building plans for two new high schools and a youth center. In September 2005, the Jerusalem municipality, in cooperation with the Israel Defense Forces, cleared a Jordanian minefield in Sur Baher. The work, carried out by an Israeli company, was completed by October 2005.[2] In May 2007, the municipality built two schools on the cleared land: a girls school attended by 800 students, and Ibn Rushd, a boys school attended by 700 students.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer 1881, p. 329
  2. ^ a b Minefield as a School Ground: The Tzur Baher Minefield Clearance Project, by Bentzi Telefus (10.1)
  3. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 120.
  4. ^ Guérin, 1869, p. 83
  5. ^ Socin, 1879, p. 161
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1883, p. 30
  7. ^ Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Jerusalem
  8. ^ Mills, 1932, p 44
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 58
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 104
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in S. Hadawi, Village Statistics, 1945. PLO Research Center, 1970, p. 154
  12. ^ Arnona 2008, newsletter published by the public relations department of the Jerusalem Municipality http://www.jerusalem.muni.il

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]