Surgeon General

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Not to be confused with General surgeon.

In the United States and many areas of the British Commonwealth, the title of Surgeon General refers to a physician commissioned by the government and entrusted with public health responsibilities. The post originated in the 17th century, as military units brought their own doctors. Thus, in the United States, the chief public health officer is the Surgeon General of the United States and each state has its own State Surgeon General. Moreover, each branch of the American military services has its own surgeon general, with more combat-related responsibilities and experience, hence Surgeon General of the United States Army, Surgeon General of the United States Navy, and Surgeon General of the United States Air Force.

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