Susan Devoy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Susan Devoy
Full name Susan Elizabeth Anne Devoy
Country  New Zealand
Residence New Zealand
Born (1964-01-04) 4 January 1964 (age 50)
Rotorua, New Zealand
Retired 1992
Plays Right handed
Women's singles
Highest ranking No. 1 (April 1984)
Last updated on: 9 May 2011.

Dame Susan Elizabeth Anne Devoy, DNZM CBE (born 4 January 1964),[1] is a New Zealand squash player who dominated the sport in the late 1980s and early 1990s. She won the World Open on four occasions.[2]

In March 2013, she was appointed to the position of Race Relations Commissioner for New Zealand.

Playing career[edit]

Born in Rotorua, New Zealand, Devoy attended MacKillop College.[3] Her family was very involved in the squash community and she started playing when she was very young.[4] Devoy turned professional at the age of 17.[5] Her first World Open title came in 1985,[6] with a subsequent win in 1987. Further World Open titles came in 1990 and 1992.[7] For most of her career, the World Open was held biennially, a fact that stopped Devoy potentially doubling her tally. She did, however, win the coveted British Open eight times, a record only beaten by Heather McKay in the 1960s/70s and by Janet Morgan in the 1950s.[citation needed]

In 1992, the year of her unexpected retirement, she was the Australian, British, French, Hong Kong, Irish, New Zealand, Scottish, Swedish and World squash champion.[8]

Achievements[edit]

In the 1986 New Year Honours, Devoy was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire,[9] and elevated to Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 1993 Queen's Birthday Honours.[10] She is also noted for her charity work, being the New Zealand Patron on the Muscular Dystrophy Association. In 1988 she walked the entire length of New Zealand, over seven weeks, and raised $500,000 for that charity.[11] Other achievements include being named New Zealand Sports Person and Sports Woman in 1985.[12]

In 1998, she became a Dame Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit, the youngest New Zealander since Sir Edmund Hillary to receive a knighthood.[7] In between her charity work she is also a professional speaker in motivation and inspiration. In 2007, she appeared on Like Minds, Like Mine TV commercials in New Zealand to counter the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness.[13]

World Open[edit]

Finals: 5 (4 titles, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1985 Dublin, Ireland England Lisa Opie 9–4, 9–5, 10–8
Winner 1987 Auckland, New Zealand England Lisa Opie 9–3, 10–8, 9–2
Runner-up 1989 Warmond, Netherlands England Martine Le Moignan 4–9, 9–4, 10–8, 10–8
Winner 1990 Sydney, Australia England Martine Le Moignan 9–4, 9–4, 9–4
Winner 1992 Vancouver, Canada Australia Michelle Martin 9–4, 9–6, 9–4

Sports administration[edit]

After Devoy retired from competitive squash, she became the Chief Executive of Sport Bay of Plenty.[8]

Personal life[edit]

She married her manager and fellow squash player John Oakley, on 12 December 1986 in Rotorua's St Michael's Church,[7] and they now have four sons[14] - the eldest of whom is track athlete Julian Oakley [15]

She currently lives in Tauranga,[16] and writes a regular column in the Bay of Plenty Times. She is a supporter of a New Zealand republic.[17]

Involvement in the Tony Veitch case[edit]

In April 2009 an accusation was made that the testimonial Devoy wrote for Tony Veitch in support of the return of his passport was edited and used in his support at his sentencing for injuring with reckless disregard in relation to an assault on his former partner Kristin Dunne-Powell in 2006.[18]

Appointment as New Zealand Race Relations Commissioner[edit]

In March 2013, Devoy was chosen as the successor to Joris de Bres for the position of Race Relations Commissioner.[19][20] She was selected by Race Relations Minister Judith Collins, who was later forced to defend the appointment, which was surrounded by some controversy, including concern over prior remarks by Devoy. In particular, references were made to her criticism of Waitangi Day as a national holiday, and those who wear burqas in New Zealand.[21] The Mana Party called for her sacking, and the Green Party said her views on Waitangi Day were "embarrassing".[22]

Devoy officially began her five-year job on 1 April 2013.[23][24]

Devoy was criticised for refusing to comment on a number of race-related controversies during her first few weeks in office, including a tirade against Chinese immigrants by New Zealand First leader Winston Peters.[25][26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Squash: Devoy signs on to head Bay of Plenty sport". The New Zealand Herald. 23 December 2002. Retrieved 2009-10-27. 
  2. ^ "Fitz-Gerald thrashes Owens". BBC Sport. 18 October 2001. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 
  3. ^ Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 3. ISBN 1877177598. 
  4. ^ Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 7. ISBN 1877177598. 
  5. ^ Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 11. ISBN 1877177598. 
  6. ^ Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 13. ISBN 1877177598. 
  7. ^ a b c Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 15. ISBN 1877177598. 
  8. ^ a b Kirk, Allan R (2006). Susan Devoy, Squash Champion. Famous New Zealanders. Masterton, New Zealand: Capital Letters Publishing. p. 19. ISBN 1877177598. 
  9. ^ London Gazette (supplement), No. 50362, 30 December 1985. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  10. ^ London Gazette (supplement), No. 53334, 11 June 1993. Retrieved 11 January 2013.
  11. ^ "Patrons". Muscular Dystrophy Association of New Zealand. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  12. ^ "The Board". Sustainability Council of New Zealand. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  13. ^ "Devoy urges embracement of Like Minds messages". Mental Health Foundation. 31 August 2007. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  14. ^ Watson, Glenn (6 January 2010). "Mum's the word for Dame Susan". Wanganui Chronicle. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  15. ^ "Winning's in the blood for Dame Susan's boy". 3 News. 12 December 2011. Retrieved 18 March 2012. 
  16. ^ "Susan Devoy's home invasion shock". New Zealand Herald. 14 March 2012. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  17. ^ "Dame Susan Devoy: 'Republic of NZ' debate due". Bay of Plenty Times. 25 December 2011. Retrieved 25 December 2011. 
  18. ^ "Veitch: Henry, Devoy distance themselves". 
  19. ^ "Susan Devoy takes race relations role". 3 News NZ. 20 March 2013. 
  20. ^ "Susan Devoy takes race relations role". News Waver. 20 March 2013. 
  21. ^ Davison, Isaac (22 March 2013). "Critics target Devoy appointment". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 22 March 2013. 
  22. ^ "Dame Susan a 'one-fingered salute' - Trotter". 3 News NZ. 25 March 2013. 
  23. ^ "Devoy criticised over anti-burqa comments". 3 News NZ. 21 March 2013. 
  24. ^ "Dame Susan made new Race Relations Commissioner". TVNZ News. 20 March 2013. 
  25. ^ "Devoy won't comment on Chinese remarks". 3 News NZ. 27 May 2013. 
  26. ^ "Devoy keeps clear of Peters' China attack". NZ Herald. 25 May 2013. 

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Vicki Cardwell
Lisa Opie
World No. 1
April 1984 – February 1988
May 1988 – April 1993
Succeeded by
Lisa Opie
Michelle Martin