Susan Gubar

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Susan D. Gubar
Born (1944-11-30) November 30, 1944 (age 69)[1]
Occupation Author, distinguished professor emerita
Notable work(s) The Madwoman in the Attic (1979)

Susan D. Gubar (born November 30, 1944)[2] is an American author and distinguished Professor Emerita of English and Women's Studies at Indiana University. She and Sandra M. Gilbert co-authored the standard feminist text, The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination (1979) and a trilogy on women's writing in the 20th century.

Career[edit]

Gubar joined the faculty of Indiana University in 1973, at a time when there were three female professors among the 70 in its English department.[1]

Gubar and Gilbert edited the Norton Anthology of Literature by Women: The Traditions in English, published in 1985 (ISBN 0393019403); its publication resulted in both of them being included among Ms.'s women of the year in 1986.[1]

Her book Judas: A Biography, was published in 2009 by W.W. Norton (ISBN 9780393064834).

In December 2009, Gubar retired from Indiana at age 65, due to complications following from a November 2008 diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer.[1] The "wrenching story" of her subsequent medical treatment led her to write Memoir of a Debulked Woman (2012, ISBN 978-0-393-07325-6).[1] She continues her story as a blogger in "Living with Cancer" for the New York Times.[3]

In 2012, she and her longtime collaborator Sandra M. Gilbert were awarded the Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award of the National Book Critics Circle.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Susan Gubar's Closing Chapters". The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 22, 2012. Retrieved April 23, 2012. 
  2. ^ U.S. Public Records Index Vol 1 & 2 (Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), 2010.
  3. ^ Gubar, Susan (October 24, 2013). "Living With Cancer: Brains on Chemo". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ John Williams (January 14, 2012). "National Book Critics Circle Names 2012 Award Finalists". New York Times. Retrieved January 15, 2013. 

External links[edit]