Susan Li

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Susan Li is a Canadian journalist who co-hosts the CNBC flagship morning news program Squawk Box from Hong Kong and on location throughout Asia and Europe.[1] Since joining CNBC, Li has interviewed Robert de Niro, Nobu Matsuhisa, Jet Li and others, extending beyond her core business reporting.[2] In May, 2014, Susan interviewed Indian Finance Minister P Chidambaram and Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda at the Asian Development Bank's annual meeting in Kazakhstan.[3]

Previously, she hosted Bloomberg Television’s First Up morning business show, where she focused on market openings across Asia, interviewed business leaders, and reported on top news stories from across the globe.[4] Susan also hosted Asian Stars which has the distinction of largely being filmed on board Hong Kong's famous Star Ferry as it crosses Victoria Harbour.[5]

Biography[edit]

Susan joined Bloomberg Television in 2006 as host of Bloomberg TV's first primetime evening newscast in the Asia Pacific, Asia Business Tonight. She started hosting Bloomberg Edge and Morning Call from 2010.

Susan has reported on and covered events such as the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, the Shanghai World Expo, the Chinese stock market bubble and the Global Financial Crisis.

Bloomberg Television

In 2012, "First Up" won the Best News Programme Award at the 17th Asian Television Awards, for which she as host was “Highly Commended.”[6] As part of Bloomberg International’s global programming, Li can be seen around the world. She is also a co-host of Asia Edge, which features more extensive interviews and news coverage.[7]

During this time, she has interviewed a range of business and government leaders, including Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, US Ambassador to China Gary Locke, Citigroup's CEO Vikram Pandit,[8] CEO of Baidu Robin Li, author Malcolm Gladwell, Blackrock Chairman and CEO Larry Finkand [9] and American casino developer Steve Wynn. In 2008 she was nominated as Best News Anchor at the Asian Television Awards.[10]

CCTV

Prior to joining Bloomberg, from 2003 until 2006, Li was an anchor at China Central Television’s CCTV International, the network’s English language channel. Broadcasting from Beijing, Li led the primetime world news broadcasts, hosted Biz China, the business news recap, and also was a news editor. While at CCTV she interviewed Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, LVMH’s Bernard Arnault, and professional basketball player Yao Ming. She herself was interviewed about what it was like to be a 'repatriated' Chinese person living in Beijing after growing up in Canada.[11]

CNBC Asia

In 2014, Li joined CNBC Asia as co-anchor of Asia Squawk Box. She co-anchored ASB with Martin Soong in Singapore before that program moved to Hong Kong on 31 March 2014. Li and Bernard Lo (himself a former Bloomberg anchor) now co-anchor Asia Squawk Box, which is now based in Hong Kong.

Li's Early Life

Earlier, Li began her career at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, where she contributed in various roles including associate producer and freelance reporter for both radio and television.

Natively fluent in English, she also speaks Cantonese and Mandarin. Li was born in China and grew up in Toronto, Canada, where she graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in economics.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Squawk Box". Marketing Interactive. Retrieved 2014-04-26. 
  2. ^ "Susan Li: TV & Radio Anchors". Business Insider. Retrieved 2014-04-26. 
  3. ^ "Squawk Box". Global Post. Retrieved 2014-05-05. 
  4. ^ "Susan Li: TV & Radio Anchors". Business Insider. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  5. ^ "Asia Stars". Bloomberg News. Retrieved 2013-03-02. 
  6. ^ "Asian Television Awards 2012". ATA. Retrieved 2013-01-03. 
  7. ^ "Susan Li: TV & Radio Anchors". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  8. ^ "Citi's Pandit Oct. 3 on Asia, Europe Debt Crisis, Banks - Video". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  9. ^ "BlackRock's Fink Says `Be 100% in Equities' - Video". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  10. ^ "Asian TV Awards 2008 Nominees". Mukamo.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17. 
  11. ^ "Coming Home". Sohu. Retrieved 2012-02-17.