Susan Lynn

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Susan Lynn
Member of the Tennessee House of Representatives
from the 57th[1] district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 8, 2013
Preceded by Linda Elam
Member of the Tennessee House of Representatives
from the 57th district
In office
January 2003 – January 2011
Preceded by Mae Beavers
Succeeded by Linda Elam
Personal details
Born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Lebanon, Tennessee
Alma mater Tennessee State University
Website susanlynn.net

Susan M. Lynn[2] (born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Tennessee House of Representatives representing District 57 since January 8, 2013. Lynn served non-consecutively from January 2003 until January 2011.

Education[edit]

Lynn earned her BS in economics from Tennessee State University.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 To regain her former seat, Lynn challenged District 57 incumbent Representative Linda Elam in the August 2, 2012 Republican Primary, winning with 4,720 votes (67.6%)[3] and was unopposed for the November 6, 2012 General election, winning with 24,116 votes.[4]
  • 2002 When Republican Representative Mae Beavers ran for Tennessee Senate and left the seat open, Lynn ran in the four-way August 1, 2002 Republican Primary, winning with 3,531 votes (50.2%)[5] and won the November 5, 2002 General election with 14,332 votes (62.9%) against Democratic nominee Danny Farmer.[6]
  • 2004 Lynn was challenged in the August 5, 2004 Republican Primary, winning with 3,228 votes (66.6%)[7] and won the November 2, 2004 General election with 28,019 votes.[8]
  • 2006 Lynn was unopposed for both the August 3, 2006 Republican Primary, winning with 6,169 votes,[9] and the November 7, 2006 General election, winning with 21,258 votes.[10]
  • 2008 Lynn was unopposed for the August 7, 2008 Republican Primary, winning with 2,743 votes,[11] and won the November 4, 2008 General election with 26,894 votes (74.4%) against Democratic nominee Ken Wilkinson.[12]
  • 2010 Lynn challenged Senate District 17 incumbent Republican Senator Mae Beavers in the three-way August 5, 2010 Republican Primary but lost to Senator Beavers,[13] who was re-elected in the November 2, 2010 General election against Democratic nominee George McDonald.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rep. Susan Lynn". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee General Assembly. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Susan Lynn's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  3. ^ "State of Tennessee August 2, 2012 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 191. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  4. ^ "State of Tennessee November 6, 2012 General Election". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 86. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  5. ^ "August 1, 2002 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 40. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  6. ^ "November 5, 2002 General Election". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 41. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ "August 5, 2004 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 30. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  8. ^ "November 2, 2004 General Election". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 41. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ "August 3, 2006 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 13. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  10. ^ "November 7, 2006 General Election". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 17 & 18. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ "State of Tennessee August 7, 2008 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 18. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  12. ^ "State of Tennessee November 4, 2008 General Election". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 30. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  13. ^ "State of Tennessee August 5, 2010 Republican Primary". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 15. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 
  14. ^ "State of Tennessee November 2, 2010 State General". Nashville, Tennessee: Tennessee Secretary of State. p. 14. Retrieved March 13, 2014. 

External links[edit]