Susan Owicki

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Susan Owicki is a computer scientist, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow, and one of the founding members of the Systers mailing list for women in computing.[1] She changed careers in the early 2000s and became a licensed marriage and family therapist.

Academic life[edit]

Owicki received her PhD in computer science from Cornell University in 1975. Her advisor was David Gries.[2] At Cornell, she invented Interference Freedom, a method for proving concurrent programs correct. [2]

She was a faculty member at Stanford University for the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Departments for 10 years. Her research interests include distributed systems, performance analysis, and trusted systems for electronic commerce and she published numerous articles and patents on her research.[3]

In 1994 Owicki was recognized as an ACM Fellow for her dissertation work An Axiomatic Proof Technique for Parallel Programs I.[4]

Industry career[edit]

After Stanford, Susan Owicki was employed by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC).

She later worked at the Strategic Technologies and Architectural Research Laboratory (STAR lab) where she held a role as Associate Director. STAR lab was the first laboratory devoted to research in digital rights management and related electronic commerce technologies.[3]

She spent four years as an independent consultant doing work in the performance of interactive television and delivery of streaming video.

Personal life[edit]

Owicki is married to Jack Owicki and has two children.[3]

Publications[edit]

Owicki's publications include

A more complete list of publications is available online.[6]

Patents[edit]

Owicki's patents include

Marriage and family therapist[edit]

Owicki is also a licensed marriage and family therapist.[7] She maintains a private practice and is on the staff of the Stanford University faculty and staff help center.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Founding Systers » Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology". Anitaborg.org. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  2. ^ a b David Gries (1973-07-27). "40th Ann. Symposium, CS@Cornell". Cs.cornell.edu. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  3. ^ a b c "CRA-W". Cra.org. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  4. ^ "ACM: Fellows Award / Susan S Owicki". Fellows.acm.org. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  5. ^ "ACM Awards". Awards.acm.org. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  6. ^ "DBLP: Susan S. Owicki". Informatik.uni-trier.de. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  7. ^ Ms. Susan Owicki Marriage & Family Therapist , MA. "Susan Owicki, Marriage & Family Therapist, Palo Alto, CA 94306 | Psychology Today's Therapy Directory". Palo Alto, CA 94306: Therapists.psychologytoday.com. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 
  8. ^ "Stanford University - Faculty and Staff Help Center - Suggested Books". Helpcenter.stanford.edu. Retrieved 2012-10-24. 

External links[edit]