Susuk

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Malay culture, susuk, or charm needles, are needles made of gold or other precious metals, which are inserted into the soft tissues of the body to act as talismans. Susuk has various supposed purposes, ranging from the purely aesthetic to the treatment of joint pains and other minor ailments. This practice are also used as protection against injury and accidents. Because the Susuk practice pre-dates the Islamicization of the region, it is prohibited (forbidden) by modern Islamic scholars (haraam).

With the advent age of modern medical technology i.e. radiography, the presence of susuk must be highlighted, as they may be mistaken for undesired foreign objects.

Beliefs[edit]

Susuk is claimed to be embeded accompanied by incantations and is usually done at a certain time to increase its effectiveness. It was also said that the susuk needs to be removed before death or the person will have difficulty dying. As such, susuk is usually removed once the person concerned is becoming old or falls ill. Removing the susuk also needs the skill of a knowledgeable person; usually the same person who inserted it in the first place. However, removing the susuk which was originally for beauty, will cause the person's face to revert to its natural age within six months. / [1]

Daisy Fajarina, mother of Manohara Odelia Manz was said to have diamond and gold susuk in her chin. Her ex-husband, George Manz said :-

.. "Once when we were together, I took Daisy to a dentist who was then shocked when he saw her X-ray. She had small gold needles and diamond stones embedded inside her chin."

[2]

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