Svaliava

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Svaliava
Свалява
City of district significance
Svaliava Center. Main Street view.
Svaliava Center. Main Street view.
Flag of Svaliava
Flag
Coat of arms of Svaliava
Coat of arms
Svaliava is located in Zakarpattia Oblast
Svaliava
Svaliava
Location of Svaliava
Coordinates: 48°32′50″N 22°59′10″E / 48.54722°N 22.98611°E / 48.54722; 22.98611
Country  Ukraine
Oblast  Zakarpattia Oblast
Raion UKR Сваля́вський райо́н flag.jpg Svaliava Raion
Founded 12th century
Incorporated 1957
Government
 • Mayor Ivan Lanyo
Population
 • City of district significance 16,903
 • Density 1,626.720/km2 (4,213.19/sq mi)
 • Metro 17,909
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 89300
Area code(s) +380-3133
Website http://www.svalyava.org/

Svaliava (Ukrainian: Свалява) is a city located on the Latorytsia River in the Zakarpattia Oblast (province) in western Ukraine. It is the administrative center of the Svaliava Raion (district). In the city, on the river Latorica situated island Martha-Margarita (Ukrainian: острів Марта-Маргарита).

Names[edit]

There are several alternative names used for this city: Rusyn: Свалява, German: Schwalbach or Schwallbach, Hungarian: Szolyva, Slovak: Svaľava, Romanian: Svaliava, Russian: Свалява.

Demographics[edit]

As of the 2001 census, the population included: [1]

  • Ukrainians (94.5%)
  • Russians (1.5%)
  • Hungarians (0.7%)
  • Slovaks (0.6%)

History[edit]

According to the census of 1910, 47.1% of the population was Greek Catholic, 26.2% Jewish and 22.9% Roman Catholic. The Jewish population was deported to Auschwitz by the Hungarian government in May 1944 and murdered by the Germans.

After the second World War a concentration camp was working near the town. Hungarian and German-born civilians (born between 1896 and 1926) were carried off by Soviet forces to the camp purely on the basis of their nationality. They were ordered to report for "malenkij robot" (a corrupted Russian for "small work"), but most of them – more than 10 thousands deportees were killed in the camp.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Gallery[edit]