Svatopluk Innemann

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Svatopluk Innemann
Innemann631.jpg
Born (1896-02-18)February 18, 1896
Laibach, Carniola, Austria-Hungary (now Ljubljana, Slovenia)
Died October 30, 1945(1945-10-30) (aged 49)
Klecany, Czechoslovakia
Occupation Film director
Cinematographer
Film editor
Screenwriter
Actor
Years active 1918 - 1937

Svatopluk Innemann (February 18, 1896 – October 30, 1945) was a Czech film director, cinematographer, screenwriter, film editor and actor. Innemann, brother of Miroslav Innemann and Liduška Innemannová, was one of the pioneers of Czech cinema.

Biography and works[edit]

Innemann, was a son of the Czech director Rudolf Innemann and opera singer Ludmila Lvová – Innemannová. He was born in Slovenia during their engagement,[1] but was raised in Prague, where he studied to be a pork butcher. Around 1918 he became interested in film, and began to work as a camera operator. As cameraman, he co-created his first film with Otta Heller. From 1919 he worked independently.[1]

Innemann's early career was varied; he was involved in operettas, comedies and melodramas, short films and documentaries, often as cameraman. He made his directorial debut in silent films with the fairy-tale Červená karkulka (Little Red Riding-hood) in 1920. In 1925 he directed the popular comedy Z českých mlýnů (From the Czech Mills) and made a biographical film about Josef Kajetán Tyl, an important personality of the Czech National Revival. In 1927 he directed Milenky starého kriminálníka (The Lovers of an Old Criminal), starring the Czech actor Vlasta Burian, known in Czechoslovakia as the "King of Comedians". He directed a total of 16 silent films: in 1931 he directed his first sound film, Poslední bohém (The Last Bohemian), about the Czech writer Jaroslav Hašek, and made the popular comedy Muži v offsidu (Men in Offside) with Hugo Haas in the title role. It remains popular in the Czech Republic.

The 1932 film Před maturitou, made in cooperation with the Czech writer Vladislav Vančura, is considered Innemann's second creative peak. In 1933, he directed the crime film Vražda v Ostrovní ulici, the first film to be made in the Barrandov Studios. His film career ended in 1937 with Švanda dudák, based on a theme by Josef Kajetán Tyl. Later, during the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, he intended to perform his own play with very controversial topic (he tried to portray German leader Adolf Hitler[2]), but from 1940 had to undergo treatments for a mental disorder. He was one of the very few Czech filmmakers who claimed German citizenship during the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.[3] During World War II, Innemann cooperated with the ambitious and unsuccessful Czech director and Nazi collaborator Václav Binovec.[4][5] At the war's end, Innemann's wartime activities were investigated. He died on October 30, 1945 at his home in Klecany, near Prague, with the investigation incomplete.[2]

Filmography[edit]

  • Neviňátka (1929) - director
  • Malostranští mušketýři (1932) - director
  • Červená karkulka (1920) - director of photography, director
  • Komptoiristka (1922) - director of photography, director
  • Aloisův los (1918) - director of photography
  • Muži v offsidu (1931) - director
  • Za čest vítězů (1920) - director of photography
  • Závěť podivínova (1923) - director of photography
  • Byl první máj (1919) - actor
  • Ve dvou se to lépe táhne (1928) - director
  • Hudba srdci (1934) - director
  • Švejk v ruském zajetí (1926) - actor, director
  • Z bláta do louže (1934) - director
  • Z českých mlýnů (1925) - director of photography, director
  • Josef Kajetán Tyl (1925) - director
  • Lešetínský kovář (1924) - director of photography
  • Akord smrti (1919) - director of photography
  • Milenky starého kriminálníka (1927) - director
  • Bílý cíl (1937) - director
  • Drž je! (1933) - director
  • Zlatá žena (1920) - director of photography
  • Jak Vašíček přišel k nohám (1921) - director of photography
  • Zelený automobil (1921) - director of photography, director
  • Venoušek a Stázička (1922) - director
  • Die Sextanerin (1936) - director
  • Československý Ježíšek (1918) - director of photography
  • Třetí rota (1931) - director
  • Vůně domova (1933) - director
  • Dáma s malou nožkou (1919) - actor, director of photography (dir. Přemysl Pražský)
  • Sňatková kancelář (1932) - director
  • Švanda Dudák (1937) - director
  • Plukovník Švec (1929) - director
  • Lucerna (1925) - director of photography
  • Prodaná nevěsta (1933) - director
  • Skřivánčí píseň (1933) - director
  • Okovy (1925) - director of photography
  • Divoká Marina (1919) - director of photography
  • Vzteklý ženich (1919) - director of photography
  • Děvče ze stříbrné hranice (1921) - director of photography
  • Boby nesmí kouřit (1919) - director of photography
  • Buď připraven (1925) - director of photography, director
  • Šílený lékař (1920) - director of photography
  • Lásky Kačenky Strnadové (1926) - director[6]
  • Vražda v Ostrovní ulici (1933) - director
  • Utrpením ke slávě (1919) - director of photography
  • Před maturitou (1932) - director
  • Karel Havlíček Borovský (1931) - director
  • Fidlovačka (1930 - director
  • Magdalena (1920) - director of photography
  • Písničkář (1932) - director
  • Poslední bohém (1931) - director
  • Sněženky (1920) - director of photography
  • Láska je utrpením (1919) - director of photography
  • Šenkýřka "U divoké krásy" (1932) - director
  • Tvoje srdce inkognito (1936) - director
  • Sextánka (Die Sextanerin) (1936) - director
  • Tchán Kondelík a zeť Vejvara (1929) - director
  • U Svatého Antoníčka (1933) - director
  • Tři kroky od těla (1934) - director
  • Falešná kočička (1926) - actor, director
  • Psohlavci (1931) - director
  • Praha v záři světel (Prague at Night, 1927) - director[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About Czech Silent Film Director Svatopluk Inneman". International forum: help.herberber.com. Retrieved 8 January 2009. 
  2. ^ a b Motl (2006), p. 249
  3. ^ Kašpar (2007), p. 185
  4. ^ Motl (2006), p. 248
  5. ^ Kašpar (2007), pp. 219-231
  6. ^ ""Lásky Kacenky Strnadové" (1926) By Svatopluk Innemann". Ferdinand Von Galitzien (blogspot.com). Retrieved 8 January 2009. 
  7. ^ "Avant-garde Film and Video in the Czech Republic". Central Europe Review. Retrieved 8 January 2009. 

References[edit]

This article incorporates information from this version of the equivalent article on the Czech Wikipedia.
  • Kašpar, Lukáš (2007). Český hraný film a filmaři ze protektorátu (in Czech). Prague: Libri. ISBN 978-80-7277-347-3. 
  • Motl, Stanislav (2006). Mraky nad Barrandovem (in Czech). Prague: Rybka. ISBN 80-86182-51-7. 

External links[edit]