Sverdrup wave

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A Sverdrup wave is a wave in the ocean (especially infinite open ocean), which is affected by gravity and Earth's rotation (see Coriolis effect)

In shallow water gravity wave [or long wave (λ > 20 h)], (h stands for depth)only gravity effect the wave, the phase velocity of shallow water gravity wave (c) can be noted as

c = (gh)^{1/2}

and the group velocity (cg) of shallow water gravity wave can be noted as

c_\mathrm{g}=(gh)^{1/2} i.e. c=c_\mathrm{g}

where g is gravity, λ is the wavelength and h is the total depth. But after concerning the inertial acceleration, the result would be different.[clarification needed]

See also[edit]