Swabian nationalism

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State flag of Baden-Württemberg bearing a shield with three lions as used by House of Hohenstaufen that ruled the Duchy of Swabia.

Swabian nationalism is the nationalism that asserts that Swabians are a nation and promotes the cultural unity of Swabians.[1]

History[edit]

Swabian nationalism grew during World War I after 1916, when the government of Baden attempted to secede and make a separate peace with the Allies, however this was put down by Prussian soldiers of the German Army. and by October 1918 with defeat of Germany looming, a wave of Swabian separatism soared across Württemberg and Baden with anti-Prussian rioting occurring.[2] In November 1918, revolution spread across Germany, with the monarchs of Baden and Württemberg being overthrown.[2] During this period France provided support to Swabian separatists as a means to break-up Germany that was viewed as a serious threat to French security in retrospect to World War I.[2]

The Swabian nationalist movement opposed continued Prussian dominance in the Weimar Republic.[1] Swabian nationalists were persecuted during the Nazi regime in Germany.[2]

After World War II, Swabians voted in favour of merging Baden and Württemberg together into the state of Baden-Württemberg, that has been regarded as a Swabian state.[2] In present-day, Swabians have pressed for autonomy and a greater say in the European Union and Swabian nationalists have cited the medieval Swabian League as an ideal model for a sovereign Swabia within a united Europe.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b James Minahan. Encyclopedia of the stateless nations. 4. S - Z. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002. P. 1807.
  2. ^ a b c d e f James Minahan. Encyclopedia of the stateless nations. 4. S - Z. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002. P. 1806-1808.

See also[edit]