Swabians

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Rutenfest in Ravensburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, celebrating the folklore story of "The Seven Swabians" by the Brothers Grimm.

Swabians (Schwaben) are an ethnic German people who are native to or have ancestral roots in the cultural and linguistic region of Swabia, which is now mostly divided between the modern states of Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria, in southwest Germany.[1] There are Swabians in Hungary.[2]

Modern Swabia

The ethno-linguistic group of Swabians speak Swabian German, 40 percent of which is intelligible to speakers of Standard German.[3] As an ethno-linguistic group, Swabians are closely related to people from Baden, Alsatians, and the Swiss.[4]

During the 18th century East Colonisation, many Swabians were attracted by the Austrian Empire's offer of settling in East European lands which had been left sparsely populated by the wars with Turkey. These ethnic German communities came to be known collectively as the Danube Swabians, subdivided into such groups as the Banat Swabians, Satu Mare Swabians and others. (If fact, also people originating from other parts of Germany came to be included in the "Danube Swabian" name). Many of these were expelled to the West after World War II. There still are Swabians of Hungarian origin that live near the city of Satu Mare in Romania, who are known as Satu Mare Swabians.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James Minahan. One Europe, Many Nations: A Historical Dictionary of European National Groups. Greenwood Publishing Group, Ltd., 2000. P. 650.
  2. ^ Christian Promitzer, Klaus-Jürgen Hermanik, Eduard Staudinger. Hidden Minorities: Language and Ethnic Identity Between Central Europe. LIT Verlag Münster, 2009. P. 196.
  3. ^ James Minahan. One Europe, Many Nations: A Historical Dictionary of European National Groups. Greenwood Publishing Group, Ltd., 2000. P. 650.
  4. ^ James Minahan. One Europe, Many Nations: A Historical Dictionary of European National Groups. Greenwood Publishing Group, Ltd., 2000. P. 650.
  5. ^ Agnieszka Barszczewska – Lehel Peti. Integrating minorities: traditional communities and modernization. Editura ISPMN, 2011. P. 148.

See also[edit]