Swan neck deformity

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Swan neck deformity in a 65 year old rheumatoid arthritis patient.

Swan neck deformity is a deformed position of the finger, in which the joint closest to the fingertip is permanently bent toward the palm while the nearest joint to the palm is bent away from it (DIP hyperflexion with PIP hyperextension). It is commonly caused by injury or inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or sometimes familial (congenital, like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome[1]).

Pathophysiology[edit]

Swan neck deformity has many possible causes arising from the DIP, PIP, or even the MCP joints. In all cases, there is a stretching of the volar plate at the PIP joint to allow hyperextension, plus some damage to the attachment of the extensor tendon to the base of the distal phalanx that produces a hyperflexed mallet finger. Duck bill deformity is a similar condition affecting the thumb (which cannot have true swan neck deformity because it does not have enough joints).

References[edit]

  1. ^ ERÇÖÇEN, A. R. et al. "Dynamic Swan Neck Deformity in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome". The Journal of Hand Surgery. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 

External links[edit]