Sweet Adeline (musical)

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Sweet Adeline is a musical with music by Jerome Kern, book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and original Orchestration by Robert Russell Bennett. It premiered on Broadway in 1929. The story, set in the Gay 90s, concerns a Hoboken, New Jersey girl who, unlucky in love, becomes a Broadway star.

Production history[edit]

The musical opened at Hammerstein's Theatre on September 3, 1929 and closed March 22, 1930, after 234 performances. Produced by Arthur Hammerstein the show was directed by Reginald Hammerstein (the brother of Oscar Hammerstein II) and was choreographed by Danny Dare.

The Goodspeed Opera House, East Haddam, Connecticut, produced the musical in May 1977, starring Cynthia Wells.[1]

In 1985 a concert presentation was given at The Town Hall, New York as part of a Jerome Kern centennial celebration, which featured Judy Kaye and Paula Laurence.[2]

Sweet Adeline was produced in 1997 as part of City Center's Encores! Great American Musicals in Concert. The concert was directed by Eric D. Schaeffer, the choreograper was John DeLuca, adaption by Norman Allen with the scenic consultant John Lee Beatty, apparel coordinator Gregg Barnes, lighting by Howell Binkley and sound by Bruce Cameron. The cast starred Dorothy Loudon, Tony Randall, Patti Cohenour, Stephen Bogardus, Gary Beach, Myra Carter, Patrick Breen, Hugh Panaro, and Jacquelyn Piro.[3]

Film[edit]

A film based on the stage musical was released in 1935 by Warner Brothers, directed by Mervyn LeRoy, and starred Irene Dunne as Adeline, Louis Calhern, Noah Berry and Hugh Herbert.[4]

Reception[edit]

Opening just before the stock market crash, it received rave reviews, but the elaborate, old-fashioned piece was a step back from the innovations in Kern and Hammerstein's Show Boat (1927), or even Kern's Princess Theatre shows.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gussow, Mel. "Adeline Is Revived", The New York Times, May 10, 1977, p. 25
  2. ^ Wilson, John.Music: Kern's 'Adeline' Is Revived" The New York Times, May 24, 1985
  3. ^ a b Brantley, Ben. "In the Wake of 'Showboat,' a Showcase for Voice". The New York Times, February 15, 1997, accessed May 14, 2001
  4. ^ Sennwald, Andre."Movie Review:'Sweet Adeline' (1935);The Paramount Presents Irene Dunne in "'Sweet Adeline'" The New York Times, January 7, 1935

External links[edit]