Sweet Soul Music

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This article is about the 1967 song by Arthur Conley. For other uses, see Sweet Soul Music (disambiguation).
"Sweet Soul Music"
Single by Arthur Conley
from the album Sweet Soul Music
B-side "Let's Go Steady"
Released 1967 (1967)
Recorded FAME Studios, Muscle Shoals, Alabama, January 1967[1]
Genre Soul
Length 2:20
Label Atco
Writer(s) Sam Cooke, Arthur Conley and Otis Redding

"Sweet Soul Music" is a soul song, first released by Arthur Conley in 1967. Written by Conley and Otis Redding, it is based on the Sam Cooke song "Yeah Man" from his posthumous album Shake; the opening riff is a quote from Elmer Bernstein's score for the 1960 movie The Magnificent Seven.

It reached the number two spot on both the Billboard Hot 100 and the Billboard R&B chart, and #7 on the UK Singles Chart.[2] J. W. Alexander, Sam Cooke's business partner, sued both Redding and Conley for plagiarizing the melody. A settlement was reached in which Cooke's name was added to the writer credits, and Otis Redding agreed to record some songs in the future from Kags Music, a Cooke – JW Alexander enterprise.[citation needed]

Lyrics[edit]

The song is an homage to soul music. The following songs are mentioned in the lyrics:

Additionally, James Brown is described as "the king of them all".[3]

At the end of the song, Arthur Conley sings the lyrics: "Otis Redding got the feeling."

Cover versions[edit]

"Sweet Soul Music" has been covered by the following groups and artists:

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Muscle Shoals Sound CD Liner Notes, Rhino Records, 1993
  2. ^ "Sweet Soul Music". Songfacts. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  3. ^ Gilliland, John (1969). "Show 51 - The Soul Reformation: Phase three, soul music at the summit. [Part 7] : UNT Digital Library" (audio). Pop Chronicles. Digital.library.unt.edu. 
  4. ^ "Ike and Tina Turner". Wilson & Alroy's Record Reviews. Retrieved June 29, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Bruce Springsteen at Madison Square Garden: Night Two". NJ.com. November 9, 2009. Retrieved January 27, 2010. 

External links[edit]