Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Men's 4 × 100 metre medley relay

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Men's 4 × 100 metre medley relay
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Sydney International Aquatic Centre
Date September 22, 2000 (heats)
September 23, 2000 (final)
Competitors 102 from 24 nations
Winning time 3:33.73 WR
Medalists
Gold medal 
Silver medal 
Bronze medal 
«1996 2004»
Swimming events at the
2000 Summer Olympics
Swimming pictogram.svg
Freestyle
50 m   men   women
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m women
1500 m men
Backstroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Breaststroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Butterfly
100 m men women
200 m men women
Individual medley
200 m men women
400 m men women
Freestyle relay
4×100 m men women
4×200 m men women
Medley relay
4×100 m men women

The men's 4×100 metre medley relay event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 22–23 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

Since the event's inception in 1960, the U.S. team dominated the race from the start to demolish a four-year-old world record and most importantly, to defend their Olympic title. Lenny Krayzelburg (53.87), Ed Moses (59.84), Ian Crocker (52.10), and Gary Hall, Jr. (47.92, an American ) put together a blazing fast finish of 3:33.73 to cut off their own standard by 1.11 seconds. Moses also produced a mighty effort in the breaststroke leg as he became the first ever swimmer to record a sub one-minute barrier split.[2][3] After accepting their golds in front of the Aussie home crowd, the U.S men unfurled a banner reading: "Sydney 2000. In our hearts forever. Thanks Australia."[4]

The Aussie team of Matt Welsh (54.29), Regan Harrison (1:01.48), Geoff Huegill (51.33), and Michael Klim (48.17) finished behind their greatest rivals by a couple of seconds, but made a surprise packet with the silver in an Oceanian record of 3:35.27. Meanwhile, Stev Theloke (55.07), Jens Kruppa (1:00.52), Thomas Rupprath (52.14), and Torsten Spanneberg (48.15) earned their first medley relay medal for Germany since the nation's reunification in 1990, taking home the bronze in a European record of 3:35.88.[4][5][6]

Netherlands' Klaas-Erik Zwering (56.83), Marcel Wouda (1:01.20), Joris Keizer (52.26), and anchor Pieter van den Hoogenband (47.24, the fastest split of the race) missed the podium by more than a full body length over the Germans with a fourth-place time of 3:37.53. Hungary (3:39.03), Canada (3:39.88), France (3:40.02), and Great Britain (3:40.19) completed a close finish at the rear of the championship finale.[6]

Records[edit]

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  United States (USA)
Jeff Rouse (53.95)
Jeremy Linn (1:00.32)
Mark Henderson (52.39)
Gary Hall, Jr. (48.18)
3:34.84 Atlanta, United States 26 July 1996 [7]
Olympic record  United States (USA)
Jeff Rouse (53.95)
Jeremy Linn (1:00.32)
Mark Henderson (52.39)
Gary Hall, Jr. (48.18)
3:34.84 Atlanta, United States 26 July 1996 [7]

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
September 23 Final Lenny Krayzelburg (53.87)
Ed Moses (59.84)
Ian Crocker (52.10)
Gary Hall, Jr. (47.92)
United States 3:33.73 WR

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

[7]

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
1 3 3 Germany Stev Theloke (55.54)
Jens Kruppa (1:01.39)
Thomas Rupprath (52.39)
Torsten Spanneberg (49.18)
3:38.50 Q, NR
2 1 7 Hungary Péter Horváth (55.74)
Károly Güttler (1:01.52)
Zsolt Gáspár (52.36)
Attila Zubor (48.96)
3:38.58 Q, NR
3 3 4 United States Neil Walker (55.10)
Ed Moses (1:01.34)
Tommy Hannan (53.32)
Jason Lezak (48.83)
3:38.59 Q
4 3 5 Great Britain Neil Willey (56.13)
Darren Mew (1:01.01)
James Hickman (52.84)
Sion Brinn (49.62)
3:38.60 Q
5 2 4 Australia Josh Watson (55.39)
Ryan Mitchell (1:02.29)
Adam Pine (52.87)
Ian Thorpe (48.83)
3:39.38 Q
6 2 5 Netherlands Klaas-Erik Zwering (56.99)
Marcel Wouda (1:01.74)
Joris Keizer (52.24)
Mark Veens (49.13)
3:40.10 Q
7 1 6 France Simon Dufour (55.82)
Hugues Duboscq (1:02.16)
Franck Esposito (52.60)
Frédérick Bousquet (49.73)
3:40.31 Q
8 1 5 Canada Chris Renaud (56.26)
Morgan Knabe (1:00.88)
Shamek Pietucha (53.27)
Yannick Lupien (50.15)
3:40.56 Q
9 1 4 Russia Vladislav Aminov (56.53)
Dmitry Komornikov (1:01.70)
Igor Marchenko (53.75)
Denis Pimankov (48.85)
3:40.83
10 1 3 Sweden Mattias Ohlin (57.05)
Martin Gustavsson (1:01.86)
Daniel Carlsson (53.30)
Stefan Nystrand (48.67)
3:40.88
11 3 6 Ukraine Volodymyr Nikolaychuk (56.41)
Oleg Lisogor (1:01.84)
Denys Sylantyev (52.99)
Vyacheslav Shyrshov (49.81)
3:41.05
12 2 3 Brazil Alexandre Massura (55.83)
Eduardo Fischer (1:03.49)
Fernando Scherer (53.80)
Gustavo Borges (49.19)
3:42.31
13 2 1 South Africa Simon Thirsk (56.88)
Brett Petersen (1:02.51)
Theo Verster (53.52)
Nicholas Folker (49.53)
3:42.44 AF
14 3 8 Croatia Gordan Kožulj (56.52)
Vanja Rogulj (1:02.19)
Miloš Milošević (54.08)
Duje Draganja (49.94)
3:42.73 NR
15 3 2 Spain David Ortega (55.68)
Santiago Castellanos (1:03.15)
Daniel Morales (53.91)
Javier Botello (50.02)
3:42.76
16 1 2 Switzerland Philipp Gilgen (57.31)
Remo Lütolf (1:01.64)
Philippe Meyer (53.95)
Karel Novy (49.88)
3:42.78 NR
17 2 7 Israel Eithan Urbach (56.12)
Tal Stricker (1:02.65)
Yoav Meiri (54.54)
Yoav Bruck (50.08)
3:43.39 NR
18 3 7 Argentina Eduardo Germán Otero (58.00)
Sergio Andres Ferreyra (1:02.73)
Pablo Martín Abal (53.96)
José Meolans (48.92)
3:43.61
19 1 8 Kyrgyzstan Aleksandr Shilin (57.88)
Alexander Tkachev (1:03.69)
Konstantin Ushkov (54.05)
Sergey Ashihmin (51.08)
3:46.70
20 3 1 Cuba Rodolfo Falcón (55.97)
Gunter Rodríguez (1:05.40)
Yohan García (55.65)
Marcos Hernández (49.86)
3:46.88
21 2 8 China Fu Yong (58.34)
Zhu Yi (1:03.35)
Ouyang Kunpeng (53.96)
Xie Xufeng (51.72)
3:47.37
22 1 1 Malaysia Alex Lim Keng Liat (58.48)
Elvin Chia (1:03.18)
Anthony Ang (55.70)
Allen Ong (50.96)
3:48.32
023 2 6 Finland Jani Sievinen (56.49)
Jarno Pihlava
Tero Välimaa
Jere Hård
DSQ
024 2 2 Poland DNS

Final[edit]

Rank Lane Nation Swimmers Time Time behind Notes
1 3 United States Lenny Krayzelburg (53.87)
Ed Moses (59.84)
Ian Crocker (52.10)
Gary Hall, Jr. (47.92)
3:33.73 WR
2 2 Australia Matt Welsh (54.29)
Regan Harrison (1:01.48)
Geoff Huegill (51.33)
Michael Klim (48.17)
3:35.27 1.54 OC
3 4 Germany Stev Theloke (55.07)
Jens Kruppa (1:00.52)
Thomas Rupprath (52.14)
Torsten Spanneberg (48.15)
3:35.88 2.15 EU
4 7 Netherlands Klaas-Erik Zwering (56.83)
Marcel Wouda (1:01.20)
Joris Keizer (52.26)
Pieter van den Hoogenband (47.24)
3:37.23 3.80 NR
5 5 Hungary Péter Horváth (55.90)
Károly Güttler (1:01.23)
Zsolt Gáspár (52.95)
Attila Zubor (49.01)
3:39.09 5.36
6 8 Canada Chris Renaud (55.66)
Morgan Knabe (1:01.23)
Mike Mintenko (52.66)
Craig Hutchison (50.33)
3:39.88 6.15
7 1 France Simon Dufour (55.67)
Hugues Duboscq (1:01.69)
Franck Esposito (52.80)
Frédérick Bousquet (49.86)
3:40.02 6.29
8 6 Great Britain Neil Willey (56.49)
Darren Mew (1:01.76)
James Hickman (52.53)
Sion Brinn (49.41)
3:40.19 6.46

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 14 September 2000. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank (23 September 2000). "U.S. Swimmers Didn't Take A Back Seat Australia Was Expected To Dominate In The Pool At This Olympics. The Americans Proved That Wrong". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  3. ^ Clarey, Christopher (23 September 2000). "Sydney 2000: Swimming; U.S. Makes Biggest, and the Final, Waves". New York Times. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Thrilling conclusion". Sports Illustrated (CNN). 22 September 2000. Retrieved 28 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Thompson wins eighth gold medal". ESPN. 22 September 2000. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (23 September 2000). "Olympic Day 8 Finals – Complete". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 28 May 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Men's 4×100m Medley Relay Heats" (PDF). Sydney 2000. LA84 Foundation. pp. 349–351. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 

External links[edit]