Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 200 metre breaststroke

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Women's 200 metre breaststroke
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Sydney International Aquatic Centre
Date September 20, 2000 (heats &
semifinals)
September 21, 2000 (final)
Competitors 36 from 30 nations
Winning time 2:24.35
Medalists
Gold medal    Hungary
Silver medal    United States
Bronze medal    United States
«1996 2004»
Swimming events at the
2000 Summer Olympics
Swimming pictogram.svg
Freestyle
50 m   men   women
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m women
1500 m men
Backstroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Breaststroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Butterfly
100 m men women
200 m men women
Individual medley
200 m men women
400 m men women
Freestyle relay
4×100 m men women
4×200 m men women
Medley relay
4×100 m men women

The women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 20–21 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

Charging back from third at the 150-metre turn, Hungary's Ágnes Kovács edged out U.S. swimmer Kristy Kowal on the final stretch to capture the gold in 2:24.35.[2][3] Kowal, who seized off a powerful lead from the start, took home the silver in a new American record of 2:24.56. Her teammate Amanda Beard, silver medalist in Atlanta four years earlier, gave the Americans a further reason to celebrate as she enjoyed the race to move up from eighth after the semifinals for the bronze in 2:25.35, holding off a fast-pacing Qi Hui of China (2:25.36) by a hundredth of a second (0.01).[4][5]

Qi was followed in fifth by Russia's Olga Bakaldina (2:25.47) and in sixth by South Africa's Sarah Poewe (2:25.72), fourth-place finalist in the 100 m breaststroke. Japan's Masami Tanaka (2:26.98) and Qi's teammate Luo Xuejuan (2:27.33) closed out the field.[5]

World record holder Penny Heyns missed a chance to defend her Olympic title in the event, after helplessly winding up a twentieth-place effort in the prelims at 2:30.17.[6] Shortly after the Games, she made a decision to officially announce her retirement from international swimming.[7][8]

Earlier, Kovacs established a new Olympic standard of 2:24.92 on the morning prelims to clear a 2:25-barrier and cut off Heyns' record by almost half a second (0.50).[6] Following by an evening session, she eventually lowered it to 2:24.03 in the semifinals.[9][10]

Records[edit]

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were:

World record  Penny Heyns (RSA) 2:23.64 Sydney, Australia 27 August 1999 [11]
Olympic record  Penny Heyns (RSA) 2:25.41 Atlanta, United States 23 July 1996 [11]

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
20 September Heat 5 Ágnes Kovács Hungary 2:24.92 OR
20 September Semifinal 1 Ágnes Kovács Hungary 2:24.03 OR

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

[11]

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 5 5 Ágnes Kovács Hungary 2:24.92 Q, OR
2 3 4 Kristy Kowal United States 2:26.73 Q
3 4 5 Qi Hui China 2:26.76 Q
4 4 2 Karine Brémond France 2:27.13 Q, NR
5 4 4 Masami Tanaka Japan 2:27.39 Q
6 4 3 Beatrice Căslaru Romania 2:27.59 Q, WD
7 4 6 Caroline Hildreth Australia 2:27.60 Q
8 3 3 Amanda Beard United States 2:27.83 Q
9 3 5 Sarah Poewe South Africa 2:27.84 Q
10 5 3 Olga Bakaldina Russia 2:28.19 Q
11 4 8 Ku Hyo-Jin South Korea 2:28.21 Q, NR
12 4 7 Rebecca Brown Australia 2:28.24 Q
13 5 6 Luo Xuejuan China 2:28.43 Q
14 5 1 Christin Petelski Canada 2:29.11 Q
15 3 6 Anne Poleska Germany 2:29.15 Q
16 5 7 Alicja Pęczak Poland 2:29.45 Q
17 5 2 Junko Isoda Japan 2:29.60 Q
18 3 2 Ina Hüging Germany 2:30.00
19 4 1 Elvira Fischer Austria 2:30.05
20 5 4 Penny Heyns South Africa 2:30.17
21 3 1 Brigitte Becue Belgium 2:31.27
22 5 8 Agata Czaplicki Switzerland 2:32.98
23 3 7 Jaime King Great Britain 2:33.10
24 2 8 İlkay Dikmen Turkey 2:33.34 NR
25 1 5 Isabel Ceballos Colombia 2:34.09
26 2 4 Inna Nikitina Ukraine 2:34.20
27 2 2 Siow Yi Ting Malaysia 2:34.52 NR
28 2 3 Margarita Kalmikova Latvia 2:35.69
29 2 5 Adriana Marmolejo Mexico 2:36.93
30 2 7 Nicolette Teo Singapore 2:37.39
31 1 4 Jenny Rose Guerrero Philippines 2:38.10
32 2 6 Íris Edda Heimisdóttir Iceland 2:38.52
33 1 3 Olga Moltchanova Kyrgyzstan 2:41.43
34 2 1 Imaday Nuñez Gonzalez Cuba 2:41.97
35 1 6 Anastasiya Korolyova Uzbekistan 2:43.23
036 3 8 Lourdes Becerra Spain DNS

Semifinals[edit]

Semifinal 1[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Kristy Kowal United States 2:25.46 Q
2 6 Sarah Poewe South Africa 2:25.54 Q
3 7 Luo Xuejuan China 2:25.86 Q
4 5 Karine Brémond France 2:27.86
5 3 Caroline Hildreth Australia 2:28.30
6 2 Ku Hyo-Jin South Korea 2:28.50
7 1 Anne Poleska Germany 2:28.99
8 8 Junko Isoda Japan 2:31.71

Semifinal 2[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Ágnes Kovács Hungary 2:24.03 Q, OR
2 5 Qi Hui China 2:24.21 Q, NR
3 2 Olga Bakaldina Russia 2:25.41 Q, NR
4 3 Masami Tanaka Japan 2:26.24 Q
5 6 Amanda Beard United States 2:26.62 Q
6 1 Christin Petelski Canada 2:29.43
7 7 Rebecca Brown Australia 2:29.90
8 8 Alicja Pęczak Poland 2:30.02

Final[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st 4 Ágnes Kovács Hungary 2:24.35
2nd 6 Kristy Kowal United States 2:24.56 AM
3rd 8 Amanda Beard United States 2:25.35
4 5 Qi Hui China 2:25.36
5 3 Olga Bakaldina Russia 2:25.47
6 2 Sarah Poewe South Africa 2:25.72
7 1 Masami Tanaka Japan 2:26.98
8 7 Luo Xuejuan China 2:27.33

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 14 September 2000. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Berlin, Peter (22 September 2000). "De Bruijn Takes Second Gold; Hungarian and Italian Also Triumph : European Swimmers Steal the Show". New York Times. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "Back again: American Krayzelburg wins 200-meter backstroke". Sports Illustrated (CNN). 18 September 2000. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  4. ^ Morrissey, Rick (22 September 2000). "Krayzelburg's Gold Leads U.S. Bonanza". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (21 September 2000). "Olympic Day 6 Finals". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (20 September 2000). "Olympic Day 5 Prelims". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  7. ^ "Calling it quits". Sports Illustrated (CNN). 29 March 2001. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  8. ^ Lord, Craig (20 September 2000). "Heyns Retires". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  9. ^ Whitten, Phillip (19 September 2000). "Olympic Day 5 Finals". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  10. ^ "Sydney 2000: Notebook; Krayzelburg Favored; Thompson a Long Shot". New York Times. 20 September 2000. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Women's 200m Breaststroke Heats" (PDF). Sydney 2000. LA84 Foundation. pp. 269–270. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 

External links[edit]