Swinhoe's snipe

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Swinhoe's snipe
Gallinago megala.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Charadriiformes
Suborder: Scolopaci
Family: Scolopacidae
Genus: Gallinago
Species: G. megala
Binomial name
Gallinago megala
Swinhoe, 1861

Swinhoe's snipe, Gallinago megala, also known as forest snipe or Chinese snipe, is a medium-sized (length 27–29 cm, wingspan 38–44 cm, weight 120 gm), long-billed, migratory wader.

The common name commemorates the British naturalist Robert Swinhoe.[2]

Identification[edit]

Identifiable as a Gallinago snipe by its cryptically patterned black, brown, buff and white plumage, but not easily distinguished from Latham's and pin-tailed snipe in the field. Commonly referred to as cho suekyung in South Korea.

Distribution[edit]

Breeds mainly in central and southern Siberia and Mongolia. Entire population migrates and spends non-breeding season principally in eastern and southern India, Sri Lanka, south-eastern China, South-East Asia and New Guinea. Recorded on migration in eastern China, and occasionally Japan. Records in Australia mainly from the Top End of the Northern Territory and from north-western Western Australia.

Habitat[edit]

Breeding habitat: forest glades and meadows. Non-breeding habitat: shallow freshwater wetlands of various kinds including paddy fields and sewage farms, with bare mud or shallow water for feeding, with nearby vegetation cover.

Food[edit]

Mainly small invertebrates including earthworms, mollusks and insects.

Breeding[edit]

Display flights and drumming by the males.

Conservation[edit]

Because of wide range and no evidence of significant population decline, the species is assessed as being of Least Concern.

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Gallinago megala". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael (2003). Whose Bird? Men and Women Commemorated in the Common Names of Birds. London: Christopher Helm. pp. 331–332. 

Further reading[edit]

Identification[edit]

  • Carey, Geoff and Urban Olsson (1995) Field Identification of Common, Wilson's, Pintail and Swinhoe's Snipes Birding World 8(5): 179-190