Sylvia Ann Hewlett

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Sylvia Ann Hewlett (born 1946)[1] is an economist, consultant, lecturer, and expert on gender and workplace issues.

A Kennedy Scholar and graduate of Girton College, Cambridge,[2] Hewlett earned her PhD degree in economics at the University of London.

Hewlett is the founding President of the Center for Work-Life Policy, a non-profit organization which seeks to develop policies that enhance work-life balance. In the 1980s, she was the first woman to head up the Economic Policy Council of the United Nations Association -- a think tank composed of 125 business and labor leaders. She is the author of several books (see Bibliography section). Her articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Financial Times, and the Harvard Business Review. She has taught at Cambridge, Columbia and Princeton Universities and held fellowships at the Institute for Public Policy Research in London and the Center for the Study of Values in Public Life at Harvard. She has appeared on 60 Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Newshour with Jim Lehrer, Charlie Rose, NewsNight with Aaron Brown, NBC Nightly News, Oprah, The View, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation, On Point, and has been lampooned on Saturday Night Live.

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Articles[edit]

  • Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Carolyn Buck Luce, and Cornel West. (2005) Leadership in Your Midst: Tapping the Hidden Strengths of Minority Executives. doi:10.1225/R0511D
  • Sylvia Ann Hewlett, Carolyn Buck Luce. (2006) Extreme Jobs: The Dangerous Allure of the 70-Hour Workweek (HBR OnPoint Enhanced Edition). doi:10.1225/R0612B

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hewlett, Sylvia Ann". Harper's Magazine. Retrieved 2007-12-14. 
  2. ^ Hunt, Pauline (2002-09-03). "Distant voices, sad lives". Education Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 2007-12-14.