Sylvia Vrethammar

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Sylvia Vrethammar
Birth name Eva Sylvia Vrethammar
Born (1945-08-22) August 22, 1945 (age 69)
Uddevalla, Sweden
Genres Traditional pop, jazz, schlager
Years active 1962–present
Labels Polydor, Sonet, Pid Records

Eva Sylvia Vrethammar (born August 22, 1945,[1] Uddevalla, Sweden), is a Swedish traditional pop and jazz singer. She is the daughter of Harald Vrethammar, an education official, and Britta Vrethammar, a musical education teacher, specializing in the piano.

In 1969, she released a Swedish-language cover version of Dusty Springfields Son of a Preacher Man, entitled En lärling på våran gård.

She is best known for the 1974 song, "Y Viva España". It reached #4 in the UK Singles Chart in September 1974, spending over six months in that listing. She was known in the UK simply as Sylvia.[2] Globally her version alone sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[3]

She took part in Melodifestivalen 2002, singing "Hon är en annan nu". She participated again in Melodifestivalen 2013 in the hope of representing Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2013 which was held in Malmö. She sang her song "Trivialitet" in the fourth semifinal, which was also held in Malmö. She came seventh, therefore she was eliminated from the contest.

Discography[edit]

  • 1969 – Tycker om dej
  • 1970 – Sylvia
  • 1971 – Dansa samba med mej
  • 1972 – Gamla stan
  • 1973 – Jag sjunger för dej
  • 1973 – Eviva España
  • 1974 – Sylvia & Göran på Nya Bacchi (with Göran Fristorp)
  • 1975 – Stardust & Sunshine
  • 1976 – Somebody loves you
  • 1977 – Mach das nochmal
  • 1977 – Leenden i regn
  • 1979 – Chateau Sylvia
  • 1980 – In Goodmansland
  • 1985 – Rio de Janeiro blue
  • 1990 – Öppna dina ögon
  • 1992 – Ricardo
  • 1999 – Best of Sylvia
  • 2002 – Faller för dig
  • 2005 – Sommar! Samba! Sylvia!
  • 2006 – Champagne
  • 2009 - Te quiero (compilation album)
  • 2013 - Trivialitet

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sök personer". Birthday.se. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  2. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 544. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  3. ^ Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. p. 351. ISBN 0-214-20512-6. 

External links[edit]