Symbolic anthropology

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Symbolic anthropology (or more broadly, symbolic and interpretive anthropology) is the study of cultural symbols and how those symbols can be interpreted to better understand a particular society. It is often viewed in contrast to cultural materialism.[by whom?][citation needed] Clifford Geertz writes, "Believing, with Max Weber, that man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun, I take culture to be those webs, and the analysis of it to be therefore not an experimental science in search of law but an interpretive one in search of meaning."[1]

Prominent symbolic anthropologists include Clifford Geertz, David Schneider, Victor Turner, and Mary Douglas.[citation needed]

Key publications[edit]

  • Geertz, Clifford (1973) The interpretation of cultures, Basic Books, New York
  • Geertz, Clifford. (Ed.) (1974) Myth, symbol, and culture, W. W. Norton, New York
  • Schneider, David (1968) American kinship: A cultural account. Prentice-Hall, New Jersey
  • Turner, Victor (1974) Dramas, fields and metaphors: Symbolic action in human society, Cornell University Press, Ithaca

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Geertz, Clifford (1973). The Interpretation of Cultures. Basic Books. p. 5. 

External links[edit]