Syracuse (manufactured products)

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In the 1830s, practically all there was in the Syracuse, New York area, outside of the salt works, were 24 manufacturing establishments including a flouring mill, two carriage shops, a planing mill, tin shop, two leather manufacturers, three machine shops, a soap and candle factory, one brewery, one distillery, three marble shops and a boat yard.

Consumer Brewery, 1901

During the mid-1850s, the city of Syracuse, New York had such an extensive salt industry, it earned the nickname, The Salt City. By the late 1880s, the city was a hub of industrial activity and was the home of typewriter, soda ash, agricultural implements, automobile enterprises and large manufacturers of shoes, iron and steel, food products, heating appliances, carriages, crockery, cans and scores of other necessities and luxuries.[1]

History[edit]

Franklin Chase, author of the 1924 history "Syracuse and Its Environs," summed up the early 20th century in the city with this statement: "In truth, Syracuse manufactured more different articles numerically than even New York City itself."[2]

Manufactured products[edit]

By September, 1910 when the noon whistles blew in Syracuse, over 40,000 working men and women "poured out" of diversified manufacturing establishments which make the city "pulsate with industrial activity."[1]

The manufacturing establishments of the city offered employment to a large army of workers. In the history of the city, salt was succeeded by the typewriter, soda ash, automobiles, shoes and agricultural implements as leading industries. In everything from men's clothing, shoes and food product industries, Syracuse was among the heaviest manufacturers in the state.[1]

According to a daily newspaper in September, 1910; "More candles, more salt and more rolling mill products are manufactured here than in any other place in New York State. Over half of the time recording machines used in the world were made in Syracuse.[1] The city was known as the Typewriter City and led the United States in the manufacture of "writing machines."[1]

In 1939, there were 275 different products manufactured in the Syracuse area,[3] however, the total number of goods produced in Syracuse throughout the years was significantly higher as the number of manufacturers and the products they produced, fluctuated from year to year. By 1968, there were over 400 manufacturers in Syracuse.[4]

Air conditioners[edit]

Automobiles[edit]

Bath fixtures and water heating[edit]

Bicycles[edit]

Candles[edit]

Cans[edit]

Carriages[edit]

China and pottery[edit]

Die-cast parts[edit]

Electrical specialties[edit]

Engines[edit]

Furniture[edit]

Gears[edit]

Guns[edit]

Hardware[edit]

Hulling and milling machinery[edit]

Machinery[edit]

  • C. E. Lipe Machine Shop (1880) - Special machinery and experimental work - known as an early incubator of many Syracuse business enterprises

Motorcycles[edit]

Railroads[edit]

Salt[edit]

Soda ash[edit]

Traffic signals[edit]

Trucks[edit]

Typewriters[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Prosperous Syracuse of 1910 Teems With Industrial Activity". Syracuse Post-Standard (Syracuse, New York). September 12, 1910. 
  2. ^ "Industrial Age Fed Syracuse Boom". Syracuse Then and Now, 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  3. ^ "Syracuse Plants Manufacture 275 Different Products". Syracuse Journal (Syracuse, New York). March 20, 1939. 
  4. ^ Snow, Nancy. "Syracuse China and the Forgotten City". The Huffington Post, January 23, 2009. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 

External links[edit]