Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse

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Syracuse Orange
SyracuseOrange.svg
Founded 1916
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Location Syracuse, New York
Coach John Desko (since 1998)
Stadium Carrier Dome
(capacity: 49,250)
Nickname Orange
Colors Orange and Navy
         
Pre-NCAA Era Champions
(5) - 1920, 1922, 1924, 1925 1957
NCAA Tournament Champions
(11) - 1983, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2008, 2009
NCAA Tournament Runner-Up
(6) - 1984, 1985, 1992, 1999, 2001, 2013
NCAA Tournament Final Fours
(27) - 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2013
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
(30) - 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
NCAA Tournament Appearances
(33) - 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
NCAA Tournament Results Vacated
1990
Conference Tournament Champions
2012, 2013
Conference Regular Season Champions
2011, 2013

The Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse team represents Syracuse University in NCAA Division I men's college lacrosse. The Orange have won 15 national championship titles, and currently compete as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference men's lacrosse conference. Syracuse plays its home games at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York.

History[edit]

Syracuse played its first intercollegiate lacrosse game in 1916, and captured its first United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) championship in 1920. It would go on to win USILA championships in 1922, 1924, and 1925 and a coaches' poll national championship in 1957 .[1]

NCAA national championships[edit]

In the modern NCAA era, Syracuse has won 11 national championship titles, in 1983, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1995, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2008, and 2009, with one additional championship in 1990 vacated due to NCAA rules infractions after an investigation revealed that Nancy Simmons, the wife of Coach Roy Simmons, Jr., had co-signed a car loan for the team's star player, Paul Gait, in the 1990 season.[2]

Jovan Miller of Syracuse defends Army in 2010.

The Orange's eleven NCAA championship titles are the most since the NCAA began holding tournaments in 1971 NCAA Division I.[3] Johns Hopkins University's thirty-four overall national championships, including nine during the NCAA era, is still the pace-setter.

The 2008 Orange are honored at the White House by President of the United States George W. Bush in June 2008 for their winning the 2008 national championship.

Big East lacrosse[edit]

Syracuse was one of seven Big East Conference schools that formally began competing in men's lacrosse in 2010. Previously, Syracuse men's lacrosse had remained independent (i.e., unaffiliated with any athletic conference). The other six Big East schools were Georgetown, Notre Dame, Providence, Rutgers, St. John's, and Villanova.

Head coaches[edit]

Syracuse has had four men's lacrosse head coaches since 1916:

  • Laurie D. Cox (1916–1930), 116-40-14 record, .724 winning percentage
  • Roy Simmons, Sr. (1931–1970), 253-130-1 record, .660 winning percentage
  • Roy Simmons, Jr. (1971–1998), 290-96-0 record, .751 winning percentage
  • John Desko (1999–present), 102-38-0 record, .729 winning percentage

As of 2010, those coaches combined for an 806-309-15 record, which is a .723 winning percentage, with 14 total national titles.

Individual honors and awards[edit]

USILA All-Americans[edit]

Twelve Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse players have been four-time United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association All-Americans:

Tewaaraton Trophy[edit]

Syracuse has also produced two Tewaaraton Trophy winners:

US Lacrosse Hall of Fame[edit]

Twenty-three Orange men's lacrosse players and coaches are enshrined in the United States Lacrosse Hall of Fame:

  • Laurie D. Cox (1957)
  • Irving Lydecker (1960)
  • Frederick A. Fitch (1961)
  • Victor Ross (1962; a three-time All American)
  • David Periard Sr. (1964)
  • Evan Corbin Sr. (1965)
  • Victor J. Jenkins (1967)
  • William N. Ritch (1972)
  • Louis Robbins (1975)
  • Stewart Lindsay Jr. (1977)
  • John Desko (1979)
  • William L. Fuller (1982)
  • Jim Brown (1984)
  • Ron Fraser (1987)
  • Roy Simmons Jr. (1991)
  • Oren R. Lyons, Jr. (1992)
  • Dick Finley (1999)
  • Brad Kotz (2001)
  • Gary Gait (2005)
  • Thomas Ortese (2005)
  • Pat McCabe (2006)
  • Tim Nelson (2011)
  • Roy Colsey (2011)

Only Johns Hopkins (63) and Maryland (31) have more inductees in the Hall of Fame.

Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame[edit]

At least one former Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse player has been inducted in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame:

National Lacrosse League Hall of Fame[edit]

Several former Syracuse Orange men's lacrosse players have been inducted into the National Lacrosse League Hall of Fame:

  • Gary Gait (2006)
  • Paul Gait (2006)
  • Tom Maracheck (2007)

Traditions[edit]

One notable tradition of the Syracuse program is the number 22 jersey, which is given to the player who is expected to be the team's best overall player. The number has been worn by Gary Gait, Charlie Lockwood, Casey Powell, Ryan Powell, Mike Powell, Dan Hardy, Cody Jamieson, and most recently Jojo Marasco. Syracuse recently announced that the number 22 jersey will next be worn by freshman Jordan Evans.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Prior to 1971, the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) selected the national champion. From 1934 through 1970, the USILA awarded the Wingate Memorial Trophy to the NCAA Division I annual champion, based on regular-season records. Since 1971, the annual NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship tournament has determined the national champion. The Wingate Memorial Trophy was also presented to the first two NCAA champions (1971 and 1972) and was then retired.
  2. ^ "Syracuse Loses Lacrosse Title". The New York Times. 1995-06-11. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  3. ^ "Division I Men's Lacrosse History". NCAA. 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-17. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]