Syriac studies

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Syriac studies is the study of Syriac language and Syriac Christianity.[1] A specialist in Syriac studies is known as a Syriacist. Specifically, British, French, and German scholars of the 18th and 19th centuries who were involved in the study of Syriac/Aramaic language and literature were commonly known by this designation, at a time when Syriac was little understood outside Assyrian/Syriac communities. In Germany the field of study is distinguished between Aramaistik (Aramaic studies) und Neuaramaistik (Syriac studies).

At universities Syriac studies are mostly incorporated into a more general field of studies, such as Eastern Christianity at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, Aramaic studies at the University of Oxford and University of Leiden, Eastern Christianity at Duke University,[2] or Semitic Studies at the Freie Universitaet Berlin. Most students learn the Syriac language within a biblical studies program.[3] Conferences for Syriac studies include the Symposium Syriacum,[4] the Section "Bible and Syriac Studies in Context" at the International Meetings of the Society of Biblical Literature,[5] and the Section "Syriac Literature and Interpretations of Sacred Texts" at the Annual Meetings of the Society of Biblical Literature.[5] Syriac journals include the annual Oriens Christianus (Wiesbaden) and Syriac Studies Today.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ An Introduction to Syriac Studies Sebastian P. Brock - second edition 2006
  2. ^ Eastern Crossroads: Essays on Medieval Christian Legacy - Page 391 Juan Pedro Monferrer Sala - 2007 "Not because this list would be very long, but since Syriac studies are mostly incorporated into a more general field of studies, e.g. Aramaic studies (as is the case, e.g. at the Universities of Oxford or Leiden), or Eastern Christianity, as in Duke, ..."
  3. ^ Orientalia christiana periodica - Volume 74 - Page 564 Pontificium Institutum Orientalium Studiorum - 2008 "(a question those of us in Syriac studies are too often asked). Then, posing the question, why study Syriac, he situates the field within the broader academy. While most students learn Syriac within a biblical studies program, Syriac also impacts ..."
  4. ^ VI Symposium Syriacum 1992: University of Cambridge 1994 Page 14 "René Lavenant, Pontificium Institutum Orientalium Studiorum - 1994 "must have felt in 1892: Syriac studies were very much alive then — however restricted the number of scholars working in the field at the time; Syriac studies are even more alive today — as the large registration at this conference ..."
  5. ^ a b http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Congresses_CallForPaperDetails.aspx?MeetingId=22&VolunteerUnitId=594
  6. ^ Eastern churches review - Volume 1 - Page 370 1966 "... assisted by periodicals devoted to Christian oriental studies; the most important for Syriac studies are the annual Oriens Christianus (Wiesbaden) and 370 Syriac Studies Today by Robert Murray, SJ."