Syringol

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Syringol[1]
Syringol
Identifiers
CAS number 91-10-1 YesY
PubChem 7041
ChemSpider 6774 YesY
UNII 4UQT464H8K YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:955 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL109652 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C8H10O3
Molar mass 154.16 g/mol
Appearance Gray to light brown solid
Melting point 50–57 °C
Boiling point 261 °C (502 °F; 534 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Syringol is a dimethyl ether of pyrogallol. It is slightly soluble in water. It is combustible, with flash point of 140 °C.[1]

Together with guaiacol, syringol and its derivates are characteristic products of pyrolysis of lignin. As such, syringol is an important component of wood smoke. In preparation of food by smoking, syringol is the main chemical responsible for the smoky aroma, while guaiacol contributes mainly to taste. Artificial liquid or solid smoke flavorings also contain the chemical, on average composing 13.73% and 13.42% of those products by mass respectively.[2] Pyrolysis oil, a biofuel derived from woody biomass, can be optimized to yield syringol as a byproduct, potentially replacing demand for petroleum derived phenols.[3] For instance, studies indicate that syringol can serve as a substitute feedstock for phenol formaldehyde resin, a commonly used, water resistant adhesive for plywood.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 2,6-Dimethoxyphenol at Sigma-Aldrich
  2. ^ Mrak, E. M., Chichester, C. O., & Schweigert (1984). Advances in Food Research, Volume 29. London: Academic Press, Inc. pp. 129–130. ISBN 9780080567488. 
  3. ^ Dinesh Mohan; Charles U. Pittman Jr.; Philip H. Steele (2006). "Pyrolysis of Wood/Biomass for Bio-oil: A Critical Review". Energy & Fuels 20 (3): 863. doi:10.1021/ef0502397. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Bridgwater, A.V.; Effendi A; Gerhauser H; (2008). "Production of renewable phenolic resin by thermochemical conversion of biomass: A review". Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 12 (8). doi:10.1016/j.rser.2007.04.008. Retrieved 9 December 2013.