Szarvas

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For other uses, see Szarvas (disambiguation).
Szarvas
Old Lutheran church (1786-1788)
Old Lutheran church (1786-1788)
Coat of arms of Szarvas
Coat of arms
Szarvas is located in Hungary
Szarvas
Szarvas
Coordinates: 46°51′50″N 20°33′25″E / 46.864°N 20.557°E / 46.864; 20.557
Country  Hungary
County Békés
Area
 • Total 161.57 km2 (62.38 sq mi)
Population (2011)
 • Total 16,954
 • Density 114.35/km2 (296.2/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 5540
Area code(s) 66
Geographical centre-point of Hungary before the Treaty of Trianon
Roman Catholic church (1808-1812)
Bust of Lajos Kossuth

Szarvas (German: Sarwasch, Slovak: Sarvaš; IPA: [sarvaʃ]) is a town in Békés County, Hungary.

Name[edit]

Placename Szarvas originated from the old Hungarian word szarvas, which means deer. Deer also can be found in the coat of arms of the town.

Location[edit]

Szarvas is located in the Great Hungarian Plain upon the Körös River, 170 km (106 mi) southeast from Budapest. Highways 44 and 443, and the Mezőtúr-Orosháza-Mezőhegyes railway line also cross the town.[1] The geographic centre of Hungary was near Szarvas before the Treaty of Trianon; a memorial in a windmill shape now marks that location in a park on a bank of the Körös River across from the Arboretum.[2][3][4]

History[edit]

According to the Hungarian Royal Treasury (Hungarian: Magyar Királyi Kincstár) it was an ethnic Hungarian town in 1495.[5] The Medieval town was ruined due to the Ottoman wars, native Hungarian population fled from the area.[5] It was uninhabited until 1720, when landlord György János Harruckern invited mainly Slovak settlers from Upper Hungary to the deserted area. They built a brand new town by the help of Sámuel Tessedik, who invited engenners to planning the town.[6] Tessedik also established the first agricultural school in Hungary. Lutheran church was built from 1786 to 1788, the Roman Catholic from 1808 to 1812. Town hall was built in 1820.[6] Hungarians overtook Slovaks in the 1920s, become the majority according to the census was held in 1930.[5]

Since 1990 Szarvas is home to the Ronald S. Lauder Szarvas International Jewish Youth Camp (Hungarian: Szarvasi Nemzetközi Zsidó Ifjúsági Tábor).[7]

Demographics[edit]

According to the 2011 census the total population of Szarvas was 16,954, of whom there were 14,325 (84.5%) Hungarians, 1,822 (10.8%) Slovaks, 489 (2.9%) Romani and 75 (0.4%) Germans by ethnicity. 15.4% did not declare their ethnicity,[8] excluding these people Hungarians made up 99.9% of the total population. In Hungary people can declare more than one ethnicity, so some people declared a minority one along with Hungarian.[9][10]

In 2011 there were 4,531 (26.7%) Lutheran, 2,601 (15.3%) Roman Catholic and 708 (4.2%) Hungarian Reformed (Calvinist) in Szarvas. 4,087 people (24.1%) were irreligious and 200 (1.2%) Atheist, while 4,601 people (27.1%) did not declare their religion.[9]

Sights[edit]

  • Szarvas Botanical Garden (Szarvasi Arborétum)
  • Bolza Castle (Bolza-kastély)
  • Dry Mill (Szárazmalom)
  • Sámuel Tessedik Muzeum (Tessedik Sámuel Múzeum)
  • Szarvas Spa (Szarvasi Gyógyfürdő)
  • Csáky Castle (Csáky-kastély)
  • Mitrovszky Castle (Mitrovszky-kastély)
  • György Ruzicskay Art House (Ruzicskay György Alkotóház)
  • Lutheran Old Church (Evangélikus ótemplom)
  • New Lutheran Church (Evangélikus újtemplom)
  • Slovak Country House (Szlovák tájház)

Notable people[edit]

International relations[edit]

Twin towns — Sister cities[edit]

Szarvas is twinned with:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Magyarország autóatlasz, Dimap-Szarvas, Budapest, 2004, ISBN 963-03-7576-1
  2. ^ "Historical Centre of Hungary and Memorial Track - National Parks". About Hungary. Hungarian Tourism Ltd. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  3. ^ "Geographical center of Hungary". Chesereu Reformed Church. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  4. ^ "Arboretum of Szarvas, Szarvas, 5540 Hungary, 46.876976, 20.536938". Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Károly Kocsis (DSc, University of Miskolc) – Zsolt Bottlik (PhD, Budapest University) – Patrik Tátrai: Etnikai térfolyamatok a Kárpát-medence határon túli régióiban, Magyar Tudományos Akadémia (Hungarian Academy of Sciences) – Földrajtudományi Kutatóintézet (Academy of Geographical Studies); Budapest; 2006.; ISBN 963-9545-10-4, CD Atlas
  6. ^ a b Antal Papp: Magyarország (Hungary), Panoráma, Budapest, 1982, ISBN 963 243 241 X, p. 860, pp. 448-449
  7. ^ Website of the Szarvas International Jewish Youth Camp
  8. ^ Gazetteer of Hungary / Szarvas
  9. ^ a b 2011 Hungarian census, Békés county
  10. ^ Hungarian census 2011 - final data and methodology

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 46°52′N 20°33′E / 46.867°N 20.550°E / 46.867; 20.550