Télérama

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Télérama
Categories Cultural magazine
TV magazine
Frequency Weekly
Publisher Publications de la Vie Catholique
Total circulation
(2014)
578,680
Founder Georges Montaron
Year founded 1947; 68 years ago (1947)
Company La Vie-Le Monde
Country France
Based in Paris
Language French
Website www.telerama.fr
ISSN 0040-2699

Télérama is a weekly French cultural and TV magazine published in Paris, France. The name is a contraction of its earlier title: Télévision-Radio-Cinéma.

History and profile[edit]

Télérama was established in 1947.[1][2] Its founder was the Christian journalist Georges Montaron.[2] The magazine had been published by Hachette Filipacchi until 2001 when it began to be published Quebecor World Inc.[3]

The magazine has been owned by La Vie-Le Monde since 2003.[2][4] It is published on a weekly basis on Wednesdays by Publications de la Vie Catholique.[2][5] The magazine has a Christianity-oriented political stance.[2]

The headquarters of Télérama is in Paris.[4] Its primary contents are television and radio listings, though the magazine also prints film, theatre, music and book reviews, as well as cover stories and feature articles of cultural interest.[2] The magazine owns a radio station.[2]

Circulation[edit]

The 1990 circulation of Télérama was 515,000 copies.[6] It was one of fifty best-selling television magazines worldwide with a circulation of 664,000 copies in 2001.[5] The magazine sold 649,000 copies in 2005.[7] Its circulation was 650,000 copies in 2007.[2]

In 2010 Télérama had a circulation of 633,559 copies.[8] Its circulation was 578,680 copies in 2014.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Daniel Gaxie; Nicolas Hubé; Jay Rowell (10 March 2011). Perceptions of Europe: A Comparative Sociology of European Attitudes. ECPR Press. p. 218. ISBN 9781907301155. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Télérama". Euro Topics. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  3. ^ "Quebecor World INC. acquires Hachette Filipacchi printing assets in Europe". US Securities and Exchange Commission (Washington, DC). 27 September 2001. Retrieved 19 April 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Télérama". Voxeurop. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Top 50 TV Guides worldwide (by circulation)" (PDF). Magazines. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  6. ^ Richard Aplin; Joseph Montchamp (27 January 2014). Dictionary of Contemporary France. Routledge. p. 446. ISBN 978-1-135-93646-4. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  7. ^ "European Publishing Monitor. France" (PDF). Turku School of Economics (Media Group). March 2007. Retrieved 20 April 2015. 
  8. ^ "World Magazine Trends 2010/2011" (PDF). FIPP. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  9. ^ "Presse Magazine". OJD. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 

External links[edit]