Túpac Katari 1

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Túpac Katari 1 or TKSat-1 is a telecommunications satellite that the government of Bolivia outsourced to People's Republic of China (PRC) to serve telecommunications in Bolivia, such as mobile, television and Internet use.[1]

It was launched into orbit on 20 December 2013 from the Satellite Launch Center in Xichang, China,[2] with a trial period of a little over three months, and commercial operation starting in March 2014.[3]

It was built on behalf of the government of Bolivia. The China Great Wall Industry Corporation (CGWIC), a subsidiary of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), was responsible for the construction (using French, German and USA technology), launch and orbit of the satellite.[4][5] The satellite had a cost of around $300 million, of which $251 million was a loan from the China Development Bank (CDB) to the government of Bolivia, and the rest was paid by the government of Bolivia.[6]

The satellite is named after 18th century Bolivian independence activist Túpac Katari.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Satélite Túpac Katari captará por año $us 40 millones para el país". FmBolivia. 14 January 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.  (Spanish)
  2. ^ ""Túpac Katari" el satélite boliviano". Semana. 20 December 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.  (Spanish)
  3. ^ "Satélite Túpac Katari está protegido con un seguro de $us 200 millones". La Razón. 13 November 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.  (Spanish)
  4. ^ "Morales viajará a China para lanzamiento del satélite Túpac Katari". Los Tiempos. 27 November 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.  (Spanish)
  5. ^ "Bolivia hails Túpac Katari satellite launch". Rapid TV News. 27 December 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  6. ^ "Evo Morales viajará a China para el lanzamiento del satélite Tupac Katari". Página Siete. 27 November 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.  (Spanish)
  7. ^ "Bolivian satellite in orbit after successful launch from China". Spaceflight Now. 20 December 2013. Retrieved 22 December 2013.