Tōkai-Hokuriku Expressway

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Tōkai-Hokuriku Expressway sign

Tōkai-Hokuriku Expressway
東海北陸自動車道
Route information
Length: 185 km[2] (115 mi)
Existed: 1986[1] – present
Major junctions
From: Ichinomiya Junction in Ichinomiya, Aichi
Japan road sign 325.svg Meishin Expressway
To: Oyabe-Tonami Junction in Oyabe and Tonami, Toyama
Japanese National Route Sign 0470.svgJapan road sign 325.svg Nōetsu Expressway
Japan road sign 325.svg Hokuriku Expressway
Location
Major cities: Kakamigahara, Gifu, Seki, Gujō, Takayama, Hida, Nanto, Tonami
Highway system
National highways of Japan
Expressways of Japan

The Tōkai-Hokuriku Expressway (東海北陸自動車道 Tōkaihokuriku Jidōsha-dō?) is a national expressway in the Chūbu region on the island of Honshū in Japan. It is managed by Central Nippon Expressway Company.

Overview[edit]

Tōkai and Hokuriku are the names of the two regions of Japan that are linked by the expressway.

The expressway begins at a junction with the Meishin Expressway to the northwest of the Nagoya urban area and follows a northerly course into Gifu Prefecture, passing the capital Gifu and heading further north into the mountainous Hida region. The expressway also passes by Shirakawa-gō and Gokayama, two UNESCO World Heritage Sites straddling the border between Gifu Prefecture and Toyama Prefecture. The expressway continues north through western Toyama Prefecture to its terminus at a junction with the Hokuriku Expressway and the Nōetsu Expressway.

The first section of the expressway was opened to traffic in 1986. The final section of the expressway (25 km between Hida-Kiyomi Interchange and Shirakawagō Interchange) was opened on July 5, 2008.[2] A major component of this section is the Hida Tunnel, the second longest road tunnel in Japan[3] after the Kan-Etsu Tunnel. A total of 1.22 trillion yen was spent on planning and construction of the expressway over 36 years.[4]

The expressway is 4 lanes from Ichinomiya Junction to Fukubegatake Parking Area, and 2 lanes on all other sections. Construction to expand the route to 4 lanes is currently underway on the section between Fukubegatake Parking Area and Shirotori Interchange.[5] The speed limit is 80 km/h on 4-laned sections and 70 km/h on 2-laned sections.[2]

Features[edit]

At 1,086 meters, Matsunoki Pass between Shōkawa Interchange and Hida-Kiyomi Interchange is the highest point in the national expressway network.[6] A parking area is planned to open at this point.

There are a total of 54 tunnels either completed or under construction. After the Hida Tunnel, the Hakamagoshi Tunnel (between Fukumitsu Interchange and Gokayama Interchange) is the longest. Trucks carrying hazardous materials are forbidden from using the tunnel and must use alternate routes.

The piers on the Washimi Bridge (between Shōkawa Interchange and Takasu Interchange) are the tallest in Japan, at 118 m.[7]

List of interchanges and features[edit]

No. Name Connections Dist. from
Origin
Bus Stop Notes Location
25-1 Ichinomiya JCT Japan road sign 325.svg Meishin Expressway 0.0 Ichinomiya Aichi
1 Ichinomiya-nishi IC Pref. Route 14 (Gifu Inarizawa Route) 1.0 Gifu-bound exit, Ichinomiya JCT-bound entrance only
2 Bisai IC Pref. Route 148 (Hagiwara Sanjō Kitagata Route) 3.9 Ichinomiya JCT-bound exit, Gifu-bound entrance only
3 Ichinomiya-Kisogawa IC Japanese National Route Sign 0022.svg National Route 22 (Meigi Bypass) 7.7
PA Kawashima PA 11.3 Highway Oasis Kakamigahara Gifu
4 Gifu-Kakamigahara IC Japanese National Route Sign 0021.svg National Route 21 (Naka Bypass) 13.3
BS Sohara BS 18.8 Gifu
5 Seki IC Japanese National Route Sign 0248.svg National Route 248 (Seki Bypass) 25.5 Seki
BS Kose BS 27.8
SA Seki SA 28.0 Gifu-bound only
SA Nagaragawa SA 30.1 Takayama-bound only
5-1 Mino-Seki JCT Japanese National Route Sign 0475.svgJapan road sign 325.svg Tōkai-Kanjō Expressway 31.4
6 Mino IC Pref. Route 94 (Gifu Mino Route) 32.4 Mino
PA Kojōzan PA 38.4 Mino-bound only
7 Minami IC Japanese National Route Sign 0156.svg National Route 156 49.6 Gujō
PA Fukubegatake PA 50.9 Takayama-bound only
8 Gujō-Hachiman IC Japanese National Route Sign 0156.svg National Route 156 59.9
- Hachiman JCT Nōbi-Ōdan Expressway Planned
9/PA Gifu-Yamato IC/PA Pref. Route 52 (Shirotori Itadori Route) 66.1
10 Shirotori IC Japanese National Route Sign 0158.svgJapan road sign 325.svg Chūbu-Jūkan Expressway
Pref. Route 82 (Shirotori Meihō Route)
76.5
11 Takasu IC Pref. Route 45 (Takasu Inter Route) 84.5
SA Hiruganokōgen SA/
SIC
91.6 SIC open until March 31, 2009
12 Shōkawa IC Japanese National Route Sign 0158.svg National Route 158 98.4 Takayama
PA Matsunokitōge PA Planned
13 Hida-Kiyomi IC/
JCT
Japanese National Route Sign 0158.svgJapan road sign 325.svg Chūbu-Jūkan Expressway
Japanese National Route Sign 0158.svg National Route 158
117.2
PA Hida-Kawai PA/
SIC
SIC: Ichinomiya-bound exit, Oyabe-bound entrance only Hida
TN Hida Tunnel Length - 10,712 m
Shirakawa
14 Shirakawagō IC Japanese National Route Sign 0156.svg National Route 156 142.2
PA Hida-Shirakawa PA Planned
15 Gokayama IC Japanese National Route Sign 0156.svg National Route 156 157.4 Nanto Toyama
TN Hakamagoshi Tunnel 165.3 Dangerous goods forbidden
SA Jōhana SA 170.1 Highway Oasis
16 Fukumitsu IC Japanese National Route Sign 0304.svg National Route 304 173.7
19 Oyabe-Tonami JCT Japan road sign 325.svg Hokuriku Expressway 184.8 Tonami
Oyabe
Through to Japanese National Route Sign 0470.svgJapan road sign 325.svg Nōetsu Expressway

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport. "History of the Expressway Network in the Greater Nagoya Area". Retrieved 2008-04-17. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b c Tokai-Hokuriku Expressway Official Website. "Opening of Completed Expressway". Retrieved 2008-07-07. [dead link]
  3. ^ Japan Tunnelling Association. "2005 Activity Report". Retrieved 2008-04-18. [dead link]
  4. ^ "36 years and 1.22 trillion yen later, Tokai-Hokuriku Expressway finally opens". Mainichi Daily News. July 5, 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-07. [dead link]
  5. ^ "NEXCO-Central Business Outline" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-04-17. [dead link]
  6. ^ Gifu Prefectural Government. "Gifu Internet Broadcast Station". Retrieved 2008-04-18. [dead link]
  7. ^ Gifu Prefectural Government. "Gifu Internet Broadcast Station". Retrieved 2008-04-18. [dead link]

External links[edit]