T-Shirt Hell

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T-Shirt Hell
T-Shirt Hell.png
Type Retail
Founded 2001
Founder(s) Sunshine Megatron
Products T-Shirts
Slogan(s) Where all the bad shirts go
Website http://www.tshirthell.com
Type of site Store
Registration Optional
Available in English
Current status Active

T-Shirt Hell is a website that sells humor T-shirts. The company is known for producing shirts that cause controversy due to the offensive material and the political incorrectness its products often convey.

History[edit]

T-Shirt Hell was founded by Sunshine Megatron in 2001. Originally named Aaron Landau Schwarz,[1] Megatron legally changed his name in November 2006 following an online contest where users voted on his new name.[2]

The site has been mentioned in publications such as Playboy, Maxim, Stuff, Us Weekly, Esquire, NY Post and on radio programs such as the Howard Stern show.[3] Celebrities pictured wearing T-Shirt Hell shirts include Slash,[4] Mark Cuban,[5] Robert Smith (The Cure)[6] and Danny Carey (of Tool).[7]

T-Shirt Hell has received a number of cease and desist letters from such people as Rick James, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, and Christopher Reeve over shirts related to the celebrities.[8]

On May 28, 2002, T-Shirt Hell filed a 15 million dollar lawsuit against the Osbourne family when the Osbournes were found selling an original T-Shirt Hell slogan; "Fuck My Family, I'm Moving in With The Osbournes!" through Hot Topic via a newly designed shirt. After several months, the suit was settled out of court.[9]

In 2005, Megatron removed the "Worse Than Hell" section of the website, where particularly offensive shirts were sold.[10] He stopped selling these shirts due to him possibly being poisoned.[11] Several weeks later, he started selling the shirts again.

On January 26, 2009, it was announced that T-Shirt Hell would close its doors in February due to Megatron not wanting to deal with 'idiots' anymore.[12] He had reportedly received a great deal of hate mail and threats.[1] Old shirts that had been removed after sparking controversy were once again sold on the website. In early February, it was announced that the site would stay open for another few weeks due to the overwhelming response.

On February 16, Megatron stated that the site was not closing, and that the closure was a stunt aimed at boosting sales. Megatron referred to the stunt as his own "personal stimulus package."[13]

References[edit]

External links[edit]