T. A. Barron

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Thomas Archibald Barron (born March 26, 1952) is an American writer of fantasy literature, books for children and young adults, and nature books.

Biography[edit]

Barron was born in Boston.[1] He spent early childhood in a town full of New England history and apple orchards, Harvard, Massachusetts. His family moved to Colorado and he spent much of his youth on a ranch in the Rocky Mountains. Barron's writing reflects his great passion for nature and the spiritual values of the natural world, as well as his belief in the power of every person. He studied history at Princeton University, where he is a 2012–2013 Trustee,[2] attended Balliol College, Oxford University on a Rhodes scholarship, and has business and law degrees from Harvard University. He served as president of a venture capital business in New York City before changing careers in 1990, when he returned to Colorado to become a full-time writer and conservationist. Since then, he has written more than twenty novels, children's books, non-fiction books, and nature books. In 2011, he received The University of Southern Mississippi Medallion for "lifetime contribution to the field of children's and young adult literature."[3]

He is an active supporter of conservation causes, serving as a board member for The Wilderness Society, the Alaska Conservation Foundation, and The Nature Conservancy of Colorado. He founded a national prize to celebrate outstanding young people who help other people or the environment -- the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes (named after his mother). He also helped to create the Princeton Environmental Institute at Princeton University in 1990. Recently, the Wilderness Society honored him with the Robert Marshall Award, its highest award given to citizens active in conservation.

Writer[edit]

In many of his novels, Barron writes about nature and ecology in mythical settings. Inspired by nature's power of renewal as well as humanity's power of free choice, he says, “I truly believe every person can make a difference — that's why I'm drawn to heroic quest stories.” [1]. His books have received the Nautilus Award Grand Prize for literature that helps to renew the spirit and envision a better world, as well as many other awards from the American Library Association and the International Reading Association. The Lost Years of Merlin epic (five titles) and the novel The Ancient One have been international best sellers; The Great Tree of Avalon trilogy has been a New York Times best seller.

Adaptations[edit]

Warner Bros. film studio is currently developing a film adaptation of The Lost Years of Merlin. Ed Whitworth has been hired on to write the script.

Works[edit]

The Heroic Adventures of Kate[edit]

Avalon/Merlin series[edit]

The Lost Years of Merlin[1]
The Great Tree of Avalon
Merlin's Dragon
  • Merlin's Dragon (2008); also issued as The Dragon of Avalon
  • Doomraga's Revenge (2009)
  • Ultimate Magic (2010)

Merlin: The Book of Magic (2011), companion to the Avalon/Merlin saga

Other fiction books[edit]

  • Tree Girl (2001)
  • Ben Barron: How the boy became king of shadows
  • Atlantis Rising'

Picture books[edit]

  • Where is Grandpa? (1999)
  • High as a Hawk (2004)
  • The Day the Stones Walked (2007)
  • Ghost Hands (2011)

Nonfiction[edit]

  • The Hero's Trail: A guide for a heroic life (2002)[4]

Nature books[edit]

  • To Walk In Wilderness (1993)
  • Rocky Mountain National Park: A 100 Year Perspective (1995)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b T. A. Barron at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-06-29. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  2. ^ "Board of Trustees, 2012–13". Vice President & Secretary. Princeton University. Retrieved 2013-06-28.
  3. ^ "The 43rd Annual Fay B. Kaigler Children's Book Festival" (2011 program). School of Library and Information Science. The University of Southern Mississippi. Retrieved 2013-06-29. Pages 1–3 cover the Southern Miss Medallion and its 2011 recipient T. A. Barron.
  4. ^ "The Hero's Trail". T. A. Barron. Retrieved 2013-06-29.

External links[edit]