T. A. Dwight Jones

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T. A. Dwight Jones
T. A. Dwight Jones.jpg
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1887-02-22)February 22, 1887
Excello, Ohio
Died June 19, 1957(1957-06-19) (aged 70)
Hamden, Connecticut
Playing career
1905–1907 Yale
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1908
1909–1910
1916–1917
1920–1927
Yale (assistant)
Syracuse
Yale
Yale
Head coaching record
Overall 69–24–6 (college)[n 1]
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1906
All-American, 1907
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1958 (profile)

Thomas Albert Dwight "Tad" Jones (February 22, 1887 – June 19, 1957) was an American football player and coach in the United States. He served as the head football coach at Syracuse University (1909–1910) and Yale University (1916–1917, 1920–1927), compiling a career college football record of 69–24–6.[n 1] He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1958.

Jones quarterbacked Yale to 6–0 and 12–0 victories versus Harvard as a junior and senior, respectively, in 1906 and 1907. Yale finished with 9–0–1 records both years, and he was named an All-American both seasons. As head coach, Jones lead Yale football to a 5–3–1 record versus Harvard, and gave the most revered pregame pep talk in Yale athletic history before the Harvard–Yale game in 1923. Before the 1925 game, Jones intoned famously, "Gentlemen, you are about to play football against Harvard. Never again may you do something so important."[2] That contest ended in a scoreless tie.

Family and honors[edit]

Jones's older brother was Howard Jones, who also played at Yale from 1905 to 1907. The elder Jones also coached at Yale and Syracuse, as well as Ohio State University, the University of Iowa, Duke University, and the University of Southern California.

The "T.A.D. Jones" room at the Phillips Exeter Academy gymnasium is named for Jones. Thomas Albert Dwight "Tad" Jones is entombed in a private crypt in Woodside Cemetery & Arboretum in Middletown, OH

Head coaching record[edit]

College[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Syracuse Orangemen (Independent) (1909–1910)
1909 Syracuse 4–5–1
1910 Syracuse 5–4–1
Syracuse: 9–9–2
Yale Bulldogs (Independent) (1916–1917)
1916 Yale 8–1
1917 Yale 3–0[n 1]
Yale Bulldogs (Independent) (1920–1927)
1920 Yale 5–3
1921 Yale 8–1
1922 Yale 6–3–1
1923 Yale 8–0
1924 Yale 6–0–2
1925 Yale 5–2–1
1926 Yale 4–4
1927 Yale 7–1
Yale: 60–15–4[n 1]
Total: 69–24–6[n 1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Though official Yale records credit the 1917 season to Jones, Thomas Bergin explains in his book, The Game: The Harvard-Yale Football Rivalry, 1875-1983, that the 1917 season was informal, with the team led by Arthur Brides and trainer Johnny Mack. The 1917 team had a 3–0 record.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bergin, Thomas Goddard (1984). The Game: The Harvard-Yale Football Rivalry, 1875-1983. New Haven and London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-03267-6. 
  2. ^ Wallace, William N. (November 18, 1989). "Ivy Title And Pride On Line in The Game". The New York Times. Retrieved July 30, 2010. 

External links[edit]