T. Michael Moseley

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Teed Michael Moseley
Moseley official photo 6.jpg
General Teed Michael Moseley
Born (1949-09-03) September 3, 1949 (age 64)
Grand Prairie, Texas
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service 1971-2008
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held F-15 Division, U.S. Air Force Fighter Weapons School
33rd Operations Group
57th Wing
9th Air Force
U.S. Central Command Air Forces
Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
Battles/wars Operation Southern Watch
Operation Enduring Freedom
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (3)
Defense Superior Service Medal (2)
Legion of Merit (2)
Meritorious Service Medal (4)
Air Medal
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Air Force Commendation Medal
Air Force Achievement Medal
Commander of the National Order of Merit (France)
Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (United Kingdom)

General Teed Michael Moseley, USAF (born September 3, 1949) is a retired United States Air Force General who served as the 18th Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force. He is a fighter pilot with more than 2,800 flight hours, many in the F-15 Eagle.

On 2 September 2005, Moseley assumed his final Air Force assignment as Chief of Staff of the Air Force— the senior uniformed Air Force officer responsible for the organization, training and equipage of more than 700,000 active-duty, Guard, Reserve and civilian forces serving in the United States and overseas. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the general and other service chiefs function as military advisers to the Secretary of Defense, National Security Council, and the President.

Moseley resigned from the Air Force at the request of U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in June 2008 in the wake of a number of Air Force scandals, including a 2007 scandal related to the Air Force's handling of the security of nuclear weapons at Minot Air Force Base. On 11 July 2008, a formal retirement ceremony was held for General Moseley; he officially retired from the Air Force on 11 August 2008.

Background[edit]

Moseley was born in 1949 in Grand Prairie, Texas. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1971 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. He earned a Master of Arts degree from Texas A&M University in 1972, also in political science. He commanded the F-15 Division of the Air Force Fighter Weapons School at Nellis AFB, Nevada, the 33rd Operations Group at Eglin AFB, Florida, and the 57th Wing, the Air Force's largest, most diverse flying wing, also at Nellis. The general has served as the combat Director of Operations for Joint Task Force-Southwest Asia. General Moseley also commanded 9th Air Force and U.S. Central Command Air Forces while serving as Combined Forces Air Component Commander for Operations in Operation Southern Watch, Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The general is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has been awarded the Order of National Merit (Officer) and the Order of National Merit (Commander) by the president of the French Republic. The Order of National Merit is the second highest French military award. He has also been awarded the United Arab Emirates' Military Medal, 1st Class, by the president of the U.A.E.

Moseley's staff assignments have been a mix of operational, joint and personnel duties. These include serving in Washington, D.C., as Director for Legislative Liaison for the Secretary of the Air Force; Deputy Director for Politico-Military Affairs for Asia/Pacific and Middle East, the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Chief of the Air Force General Officer Matters Office; Chief of Staff of the Air Force Chair and Professor of Joint and Combined Warfare at the National War College; and Chief of the Tactical Fighter Branch, Tactical Forces Division, Directorate of Plans, Headquarters U.S. Air Force.

Moseley assumed the position of Chief of Staff of the Air Force during a ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base on September 2, 2005.

Moseley personally "adopted" the United States Air Force Academy Class of 2009 as his own, and has gone out of his way to address the future leaders of the U.S. Air Force. On March 8, 2007, the Grand Prairie ISD school board unanimously voted to name an elementary school opening in the 2007–2008 school year Mike Moseley Elementary School in honor of his achievements and as a native of Grand Prairie.

As a result of a series of high-profile scandals and his resistance to the new drone programs,[1] Moseley, along with the Secretary of the Air Force, was forced to resign[2]—his resignation coming on 5 June 2008 in the wake of a report that criticized the service's handling of nuclear weapons security related to the 2007 United States Air Force nuclear weapons incident and a misshipment of nuclear missile components to Taiwan.[3][4] Following his resignation, Moseley continued to serve as Chief of Staff of the Air Force until his official retirement ceremony at Bolling AFB, Washington, D.C. on 11 July 2008.[5] (See 2007 United States Air Force nuclear weapons incident)

On 11 July 2008, Moseley had his formal retirement ceremony at Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. Former Secretary of the Air Force, the Honorable Michael Wynne presided over the ceremony. Moseley officially retired from the Air Force on August 1, 2008.

Thunderbirds "Thundervision" scandal[edit]

Members of the United States Air Force were under investigation by the FBI for having awarded a $50 million contract for audio-visual presentation services to Strategic Message Solutions (SMS) of Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.[6][7] The contract involved the "Thundervision" project, meant to provide oversized video screens and perhaps content services during air shows that featured the Air Force Thunderbirds. The investigation revolves around possible involvement of former Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. (ret.) John P. Jumper, and Chief of Staff of the Air Force T. Michael Moseley. It is suggested that the contract price was inflated, because a friend of the two generals, Air Force General (ret.) Hal Hornburg, was associated with Strategic Message Solutions. Two companies involved in the bidding process protested award of the contract in January 2006, one having offered comparable services for half as much. The Air Force cancelled the contract in February 2006.[8]

In July 2009 the DoD IG concluded that Moseley violated Federal rules and regulations by helping steer the Thunderbirds promotion contract to SMS. The investigation found that Moseley gave SMS personal access to his office and direct access to USAF resources before the contract bid, including personnel and equipment. The IG also concluded Moseley improperly solicited and accepted gratuities from the owner of SMS, including arranging for a friend to fly in the owner's vintage fighter plane and accepting dinner and an overnight stay at the SMS owner's home.[9] In October 2009, Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley issued Retired General Moseley a "Letter of Admonishment in Retirement" for his actions.[10]

Education[edit]

General Moseley at his retirement ceremony with cadets from his alma mater, Texas A&M University

Assignments[edit]

  1. June 1972 - May 1973, student, Undergraduate Pilot Training, Webb AFB, Texas
  2. May 1973 - July 1977, T-37 instructor pilot and spin flight test pilot; flight check pilot, and standardization and evaluation flight examiner, 3389th Flying Training Squadron, 78th Flying Training Wing, Webb AFB, Texas
  3. July 1977 - September 1979, F-15 instructor pilot, flight lead and mission commander, 7th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Holloman AFB, New Mexico
  4. September 1979 - August 1983, F-15 weapons and tactics officer, instructor pilot, and flight lead and mission commander; standardization and evaluation/ flight examiner, 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron and 12th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan
  5. August 1983 - June 1984, course officer, Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
  6. June 1984 - June 1987, Chief, Tactical Fighter Branch, Tactical Forces Division, Directorate of Plans, Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  7. June 1987 - June 1989, Commander, F-15 Division, and instructor pilot, Fighter Weapons Instructor Course, U.S. Air Force Fighter Weapons School, Nellis AFB, Nevada
  8. June 1989 - June 1990, course officer, National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.
  9. June 1990 - August 1992, Chief of Staff of the Air Force Chair and Professor of Joint and Combined Warfare, National War College, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C.
  10. August 1992 - January 1994, Commander, 33rd Operations Group, Eglin AFB, Florida
  11. January 1994 - May 1996, Chief, Air Force General Officer Matters Office, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  12. May 1996 - November 1997, Commander, 57th Wing, Nellis AFB, Nevada
  13. November 1997 - July 1999, Deputy Director for Politico-Military Affairs, Asia/Pacific and Middle East, Directorate for Strategic Plans and Policy, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D.C.
  14. July 1999 - October 2001, Director, Legislative Liaison, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  15. November 2001 - August 2003, Commander, 9th Air Force and U.S. Central Command Air Forces, Shaw AFB, South Carolina
  16. August 2003 - August 2005, Vice Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
  17. September 2005 - July 2008, Chief of Staff, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.[11]

Flight information[edit]

Rating: Command pilot
Flight hours: more than 2,800
Aircraft flown: T-37, T-38, AT-38 and F-15A/B/C/D

Honors[edit]

Moseley had an elementary school named in his honor. Mike Moseley Elementary opened in Moseley's home town of Grand Prairie, Texas in 2007. The elementary school has roughly 550 students from pre-k to 5th grades. Mike Moseley Elementary is part of the Grand Prairie Independent School District. Their mascot is the Thunderbird.

Major awards and decorations[edit]

COMMAND PILOT WINGS.png US Air Force Command Pilot Badge
Joint Chiefs of Staff seal.svg Joint Chiefs of Staff Badge
Headquarters US Air Force Badge.png Headquarters Air Force Badge
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Defense Distinguished Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Defense Superior Service Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with a pair of width-2 white stripes on the edges
Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with three bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Medal
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Air Force Commendation Medal
Air Force Achievement Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Joint Meritorious Unit Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Force Meritorious Unit Award
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with four bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Organizational Excellence Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Combat Readiness Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze star
Bronze star
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service star
Bronze star
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with bronze service star
Bronze star
Width-44 ribbon with the following stripes, arranged symmetrically from the edges to the center: width-2 black, width-4 chamois, width-2 Old Glory blue, width-2 white, width-2 Old Glory red, width-6 chamouis, width-3 myrtle green up to a central width-2 black stripe
Southwest Asia Service Medal with bronze service star
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Korea Defense Service Medal
Humanitarian Service Medal
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with gold frame and two bronze oak leaf clusters
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and three bronze oak leaf clusters
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon
Air Force Training Ribbon
French National Order of Merit, Commandeur Medal
United Arab Emirates' Military Merit Order, First Class
Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire[12]
Brazilian Santos-Dumont Medal of Merit[13]
Singaporean Meritorious Service Medal (Military)
SICOFAA Legion of Merit Grand Cross[14]

Effective dates of promotion[edit]

Promotions
Insignia Rank Date
US-O10 insignia.svg General October 1, 2003
US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General  November 7, 2001
US-O8 insignia.svg Major General February 1, 2000
US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General December 1, 1996
US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel April 1, 1991
US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel March 1, 1986
US-O4 insignia.svg Major October 1, 1983
US-O3 insignia.svg Captain January 9, 1976
US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant July 9, 1974
US-O1 insignia.svg Second Lieutenant July 9, 1971

Activities since retirement[edit]

Moseley has called for the retirement of the Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II, comparing it to the North American P-51 Mustang which had been quickly retired after the Second World War and then even more quickly pressed back into active service at the start of the Korea War.[15]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ MIT Technology Review Vol.116 No.4 pg. 39
  2. ^ "Moseley and Wynne forced out". Air Force Times. June 9, 2008. 
  3. ^ Brook, Tom Vanden (June 5, 2008). "Nuclear mishaps lead to Air Force resignations". USA Today. 
  4. ^ "Chief of Staff United States Air Force Resigns" (Press release). United States Air Force (release 020608). June 5, 2008. Archived from the original on December 12, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Chief of staff retires after 37 years". United States Air Force. July 11, 2008. Archived from the original on December 12, 2012. 
  6. ^ FBI Investigating $50M Air Force Contract
  7. ^ While troops get their heads blown off in Iraq...
  8. ^ Air Force terminates contract The Official Web site of the United States Air Force
  9. ^ Anglen, Robert, "Air Force Chief Of Staff Acted Improperly Over Air-Show Deal, Feds Say", Arizona Republic, July 17, 2009, p. 1.
  10. ^ Air Force secretary takes action on DOD IG report 10/8/2009 The Official Web site of the United States Air Force
  11. ^ Chief of Staff United States Air Force Resigns Washington, DC — Recent events have highlighted a loss of focus on certain critical matters within the Air Force. As the Air Force's senior uniformed leader, I take full responsibility for events which have hurt the Air Force's reputation or raised a question of every Airman's commitment to our core values. For the past 36 years I have been privileged to serve my country as an Airman in the United States Air Force in peacetime and combat. I was honored and humbled to be appointed the Air Force's 18th Chief of Staff and have been proud to serve our Airmen and their families. Upon taking office, I worked hard with Secretary Wynne to ensure the Air Force provided the right forces at the right time to help our Nation and allies win the Global War on Terror. I think the honorable thing to do is to step aside. After consulting with my family, I intend to submit my request for retirement to Secretary Gates. The Air Force is bigger than one Airman, and I have full confidence that the Air Force will continue working with the Joint team to win today's fight, take care of its Airmen, and meet tomorrow's challenges. I love the Air Force and remain proud of America's Airmen. T. Michael Moseley Chief of Staff United States Air Force
  12. ^ Lopez, Staff Sgt. C. Todd (May 31, 2006). "General Moseley knighted for contributions to international relations". Air Force Link. Archived from the original on December 12, 2012. Retrieved May 31, 2006. 
  13. ^ :: Força Aérea Brasileira ::
  14. ^ [1]
  15. ^ EVERSTINE, BRIAN (5 December 2013). "Former Top USAF General: Time To Cut the A-10". defensenews.com. Gannett Government Media Corporation. Retrieved 5 December 2013. 
Military offices
Preceded by
Robert H. Foglesong
Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
2003 - 2005
Succeeded by
John D.W. Corley
Preceded by
John P. Jumper
Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force
2005–2008
Succeeded by
Norton A. Schwartz