T13 (classification)

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Final competition of Men's 5000m T13 at the Parapan American Games Rio 2007

T13 and B3 are equivalent disability sport classification for disability athletics. They cover athletes with a visual impairment who "can recognise contours between 2 and 6 metres away".

History[edit]

The classification was created by the International Paralympic Committee and has roots in a 2003 attempt to address "the overall objective to support and co-ordinate the ongoing development of accurate, reliable, consistent and credible sport focused classification systems and their implementation."[1]

Sport[edit]

Visualisation of functional vision for a T13 classified competitor

This classification is for disability athletics.[2] This classification is one of three classifications for athletes with visual impairment. They are T11, T12 and T13.[3] Jane Buckley, writing for the Sporting Wheelies, describes the athletes in this classification as: "B3 athletes – see IBSA classes (appendix)"[2] The classification in the appendix by Buckley goes on to say "".[clarification needed][2] The Australian Paralympic Committee defines this classification as being for athletes who "can recognise contours between 2 and 6 metres away i.e. 2/60 – 6/60 and visual field of more than five (5) degrees and less than twenty (20) degrees." [4]

Becoming classified[edit]

For Australian athletics competitors seeking to be classified in this category, they need to undergo a classification evaluation where they will earn either provisional or national certification depending on who the evaluators are. Athletes undergo a medical examination and are asked to demonstrate their skills in athletics. They may also be asked to demonstrate other sport related skills such as jumping rope or swimming. A determination is then made as to what an classification an athlete should compete in.[5]

Competitors[edit]

In 2011, Jason Smyth from Ireland and born in 1987 is ranked 1 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Labzin Alexey from South Africa and born in 1978 is ranked 2 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Ntutu Ndodomzi Jonathan from Germany and born in 1986 is ranked 3 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Yuan Yizhi from China and born in 1987 is ranked 4 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Protos Ioannis from New Zealand and born in 1982 is ranked 5 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Zverev Alexander from Germany and born in 1989 is ranked 6 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Zlatanov Radoslav from New Zealand and born in 1987 is ranked 7 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Hosseini Liravi Seyed Erfan from Turkey and born in 1984 is ranked 8 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Chaiya Somdech from Turkey and born in 1991 is ranked 10 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Kadhim Hussein from New Zealand and born in 1988 is ranked 11 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6] Andrade Andre from Brazil and born in 1981 is ranked 12 in the world in the 100 metre event.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paralympic Classification Today". International Paralympic Committee. 22 April 2010. p. 3. 
  2. ^ a b c Buckley, Jane (2011). "Understanding Classification: A Guide to the Classification Systems used in Paralympic Sports". Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "Summer Sports » Athletics". Australia: Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  4. ^ "Classification Information Sheet". Sydney, Australia. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "CLASSIFICATION Information for Athletes". Sydney Australia: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2 July 2010. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "IPC Athletics Rankings Official World Rankings 2011". International Paralympic Committee. 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011.