T34 (classification)

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T34 and CP4 are disability sport classification for disability athletics.

History[edit]

The classification was created by the International Paralympic Committee and has roots in a 2003 attempt to address "the overall objective to support and co-ordinate the ongoing development of accurate, reliable, consistent and credible sport focused classification systems and their implementation."[1]

Sport[edit]

This classification is for disability athletics.[2] This classification is one of eight classifications for athletes with cerebral palsy, four for wheelchair athletes (T31, T32, T33, T34) and four for ambulant ones (T35, T36, T37 and T38).[3] Jane Buckley, writing for the Sporting Wheelies, describes the athletes in this classification as: "CP4, see CP-ISRA classes (appendix) Wheelchair".[2] The classification in the appendix by Buckley goes on to say "The athlete has minimal limitations or control problems in their arms and trunk while pushing a wheelchair."[2] The Australian Paralympic Committee defines this classification as being for "Moderate to severe problems in lower limbs, good functional strength and minimal control problems in upper limbs and torso".[4] According to [International Paralympic Committee] rules, an ambulant athlete with spastic diplegia featuring lower limb spasticity Grade 3 is eligible to compete in either the T35 classification (running) or as a wheelchair racer in T34.[5]

Becoming classified[edit]

Athletes with cerebral palsy or similar impairments who wish to compete in para-athletics competition must first undergo a classification assessment. During this, they both undergo a bench test of muscle coordination and demonstrate their skills in athletics, such as pushing a racing wheelchair and throwing. A determination is then made as to what an classification an athlete should compete in. Classifications may be Confirmed or Review status. For athletes who do not have access to a full classification panel, Provisional classification is available; this is a temporary Review classification, considered an indication of class only, and generally used only in lower levels of competition.[6]

Competitors[edit]

Australian athletics competitors in this class include Rheed McCracken, Rosemary Little and Kristy Pond.[7]

Hannah Cockcroft, representing Great Britain, is the current world record holder in the Women's T34 100m and 200m. She won gold medals at both these distances at the 2012 Summer Paralympics.

In 2011, Sebastien Mobre from Switzerland and born in 1981 is ranked 1 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Mohamed Hammadi who represents United Arab Emirates and born in 1985 is ranked 2 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Stefan Rusch from The Netherlands and born in 1993 is ranked 3 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Austin Pruitt from United States of America and born in 1994 is ranked 4 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Asturo Kobata from Japan and born in 1993 is ranked 5 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Matthew Hickling from Great Britain and born in 1993 is ranked 6 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Bart Pijs from Switzerland and born in 1983 is ranked 7 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Jamie Carter from Great Britain and born in 1994 is ranked 8 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Janne Seppala from Finland and born in 1980 is ranked 9 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8] Henk Schuiling from New Zealand and born in 1983 is ranked 10 in the world in the 100 metre event.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paralympic Classification Today". International Paralympic Committee. 22 April 2010. p. 3. 
  2. ^ a b c Buckley, Jane (2011). "Understanding Classification: A Guide to the Classification Systems used in Paralympic Sports". Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "Summer Sports » Athletics". Australia: Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  4. ^ "Classification Information Sheet". Sydney, Australia. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "IPC Athletics Classification Rules and Regulations". International Paralympic Committee. 
  6. ^ "CLASSIFICATION Information for Athletes". Sydney Australia: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2 July 2010. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Australian Athletics Classification Masterlist". Sydney, Australia: Australian Paralympic Committee. 3 November 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "IPC Athletics Rankings Official World Rankings 2011". International Paralympic Committee. 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011.